bread · Greek recipe

Greek Bread with Yogurt

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι

I just adore this little pinnacle on top of the white bread loaf I baked recently – succumbing to a sudden desire to make white bread finally. White-white bread. White as snow which hopefully will not come in an avalanche as it did last November.

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι

Here it is once more:

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι

And although I did cheat with this recipe using smetana (Russian 15% fat sour cream) instead of Greek yogurt, it turned out really nice and almost … creamy. It was a challenge not to throw in some extras which I’d normally use (all types of bran, wheat germ, whole seeds, ground seeds etc) but I held on tight.

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι

1 year ago – Tram to Polytechnic University

2 years ago – Tarascon and Beaucaire, on Bike and on Foot

3 years ago – Enjoying Indian Summer in Imatra, Finland

4 years ago – Two Recipes for Your Loaf Pan

5 years ago – Borodinskiy Rye Bread

6 years ago – I’m Alright! Still Baking =)

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι adapted from the homely tantekiki.blogspot.com will make super-soft super-white bread perfect for cheese sandwiches or buterbrot. See my remarks in italics.

Ingredients

  • 550 g all-purpose flour
  • 9 g yeast (1 package) – I used active dry yeast
  • 1 1/3 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 300-310 ml lukewarm water
  • 80 g yogurt – I used smetana, aka 15 % fat sour cream but feel free to use (Greek) yogurt
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil (Greek, please!)

Procedure

In a bowl place flour, yeast, sugar, yogurt and olive oil (as I was using active dry yeats, I first activated it in lukewarm water with sugar and salt). Dissolve salt in lukewarm water and then gradually add it to the bowl in three parts, starting to knead. If the dough is too sticky, do not add more flour but oil instead to grease your hands. Knead some more till you get a soft ball of dough. Grease your bowl with oil as well as the dough ball. Cover and leave inside your oven with the light on for 1-2 hours until the dough is fully risen (I just left it in a safe spot of my kitchen).

When the dough doubles, divide it into two equal parts and shape each into oblong loaves (I only made 1 loaf). Place the loaves into appropriate pans lined with parchment paper that you should grease with some oil (which I did not). Cover and leave to rise again for 40-50 minutes more or until they rise and cover 2/3 of the pan. Meanwhile preheat the oven to 170 ‘C.

Make 4-5 diagonal slashes on top of the loaves, spritz with some water and then brush with oil (optional). Place the loaves on the second shelf from the bottom, also placing a baking dish with some water in it on the bottom to create steam (I usually use the metal shelf placed right onto the bottom). Bake for 40-50 minutes or until the loaves are golden brown. Take them out of the oven, leave for 5-10 minutes to cool and then take them out of their pans onto a cooling rack. When the bread is completely cool, you can also slice the loaves and freeze them (I normally freeze whole loaves).

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι

Here the bread is pictured with some Rossiysky cheese (aka Russian cheese). Which comes in all sort of flavours and shades, can’t really make head or tail of it but can easily identify it if I taste it. Kind of moist and rubbery and usually abhorred by cheese-pampered foreigners.

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι

Remarks: This bread gets dry pretty fast – as any 100% white yeast bread.

Result: Soft and almost sweet bread from Greece, for a classic Russian breakfast 🙂 Have your black tea ready!

Greek Bread with Yogurt or Ψωμί με γιαούρτι

By the way, King Arthur Flour just published great tips on bread scoring techniques on their blog.

This post goes to the Yeast Bread and Greek recipe collections.

G.

bread · Italian recipe · leftovers

Pane a Spiga con Patate or Spike-Like Potato Bread

Pane con Patate

These last days of the year I’ve been baking a lot – making up for the days I’m going to be away from the family oven soon 🙂 Among all that I could manage to bake and squeeze into the freezer for my parents, this potato bread in particular stands out of the crowd. This is an Italian recipe which originally calls for lard but which I quite successfully turned into a vegetarian version, using butter instead.

Pane con Patate

It looks kind of funny too. It’s supposed to resemble a spike (spiga) but mine looks more like some insect. Well it might as well but it certainly tastes like white bread! 🙂

Pane con Patate

A year ago – Architectural Walks in Kolpino Part 6 – Prospekt Lenina

Two years ago – Old-Fashioned Apple Slab and Greek Crumble

Three years ago – Goodbye 2013

Four years ago – Let Me Invite You into the New Year

Five years ago – Flammekueche

Pane a Spiga con Patate or Italian Spike-Like Potato Bread translated and adapted from the original recipe at ilpane.blogspot.com will make a giant loaf of soft and sweetish white bread.

Ingredients:

  • 500 g flour (or farina 0 if you can get it), sifted
  • 200 g water
  • 12 g fresh yeast – I used an equivalent 1.4 tsp of instant yeast
  • 10 g salt
  • 15 g sugar
  • 25 g home made lard – I used butter instead
  • 300 g of boiled and pureed potatoes (weigh them after pureeing)

Procedure:

Place all the ingredients in a big bowl, adding the pureed potatoes last. Knead the dough pretty well, about 10 minutes, then place the dough into a greased bowl. Leave to rise for 1 hour. Turn the dough out onto a work surface and form 2 logs (batards), one smaller than the other (roughly a 1/3 and a 2/3) and leave them to rise for 30 minutes. With a help of a rolling pin or just with your hand make an indent in the center of the bigger log and place there the smaller one, pinching it so that they stick to each other (I had to reshape them both after the 30-minute rise as they were quite puffed at that point). Cover the loaf and leave it to rise for 40 more minutes. Dust it abundantly with ground bran (almost forgot to do it and dusted it with lour instead) and cut the top part with scissors to resemble a spike (I cut the lower part too and in a much freer fashion so to speak 🙂 ). Bake in the preheated 220 °C oven for 30 minutes or until your bread is done (mine took a bit longer).

Pane con Patate

Remarks: I used leftover potato puree which my Mother makes with milk and butter (plus salt). There were little bits of it visible in the crumb and I think the puree also added sweetness to the bread. I guess that eaten with some soup or cheese will counterbalance the sweetness. The loaf is huge but has baked through just fine.

Pane con Patate

Result: Soft and really white, a tad on the sweet side with a contrasting ‘burnt’ crust. Flavourful. The recipe is quite easy (having leftover potato puree helps a lot too) and yet the result is pretty impressive. And it does taste Italian to me! 

Pane con Patate

The air bubbles and the crust:

Pane con Patate

If you are looking for more Italian bread, here’s another – sourdough – version of potato bread (also with herbs) Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina, sourdough oatmeal bread Pane di avena a lievitazione naturale, leavened Italian Panini all’Olio, Pane Tipo Altamura, Tuscan Bread, Stirato or Italian Baguettes, or simply Italian Bread.

This post goes to the Leftovers, Yeast Bread and By Country recipe collections.

G.

bread · St Petersburg

Pillow-like Corn Bread

Corn Bread

This recipe has been in my ‘to-do’ collection for years. And now that I’ve made it I’m impressed! So super airy and soft – and so very sunny, like a yellow pillow 🙂

Corn Bread

I’ve made it with polenta (corn meal here in Russia is either too fine or too grainy, like grits) and I liked the color and the texture it gave to the bread. Be aware though that this bread requires a poolish so it will take some time before it gets to your table:

Corn Bread

The author of this recipe says it comes from North America, where corn is one of the main food sources. So let’s say this is yet another country-specific recipe to my collection!

Corn Bread

1 year ago – Almond Biscotti and Sour Cream Snickerdoodles

2 years ago – Makowiec or Poppy Seed Roll for Easter

3 years ago – Experimenting with Sourdough Bread

4 years ago – Peach Cheese Cake for Victory Day

Corn Bread adapted from www.breadcetera.com will make an airy and soft bread with a crisp crust and tiny yellow grains inside. For the entire recipe click on the link.

My changes and remarks:

Used polenta instead of corn flour (corn meal); did not use any couche to proof the bread, just left it covered after shaping.

I enjoyed the process of creating the pattern on top of the loaves: you’re first dusting it with flour except for a strip in the middle (I used a ruler instead of a strip of paper) and then scoring to make it look like a kernel. It didn’t come out that very kernel-like in my case though.

Corn Bread

And just as any super-soft bread expect this one to dry out pretty fast (I mean it!). So if you’re intending to make the entire recipe, be sure to freeze the ‘extra’ loaves. I froze one (and good for me – as I had to reshoot it after accidentally deleting all my pictures of the other two loaves).

Corn Bread

Result: This bread will make soft slices with crunchy-crispy crust (that will most definitely break into pieces), perfect for morning. It doesn’t have a very distinct flavour but the colour is visible:

Corn Bread

Golden crust and yellow crumb:

Corn Bread

This post goes to my Yeast Bread and By Country collections.

G.

bread · French recipe · Italian recipe · pies · sourdough · sweet

Pear Croustade and Pane Tipo Altamura

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Sharing with you two recipes I’ve tried recently. That was a rather gloomy day (typical St Petersburg!) which of course did not prevent us from enjoying the food 🙂 Let’s start with the sweet part of the post (how untypical!).

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

A year ago – Buttery Sourdough Buns and Off We Go

Two years ago – Two Cloudberry Cakes

Three years ago – Apples and Chocolate

Four years ago – Meanwhile… What’s Cooking in My Post-Soviet Kitchen Apart from Soviet Things

Pear Croustade adapted from kalofagas.ca will make a super-flavourful and super-crunchy tarte! Check out the link to get the entire recipe.

My changes: Used 3 pears without peeling. Did not add lemon juice or allspice, just the ground anise seeds.

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

Remarks: A croustade (typically made with apples in France) is supposed to be crunchy so do not worry if your crust is too thin, it will work out perfectly fine! The original recipe comes from USA though, but I can imagine such a croustade being perfectly French too. I was lazy enough to grate some allspice over the pears but I guess the two spices would taste even more untypical in this pie!

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

Result: Soft pears on a crunchy crust! A very untypical combination of anise and pears will make this pie disappear too fast 🙂 It’s rustic and at the same time sophisticated – or rather, delicate.

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

*** 

After a French-American recipe, here’s some Italian bread made with rye sourdough culture. A huge loaf with white crumb and air bubbles:

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Pane Tipo Altamura or Altamura Bread adapted from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com will make a giant loaf of crumbly white bread. For the entire recipe please visit the original website (where you will find lots of other great recipes like Soder Light Rye or Pane di Ceci for example).

My changes: Fed my rye sourdough culture with whole wheat flour which resulted in a slightly less white color of the crumb. Used all purpose flour instead of high protein white wheat flour.

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Remarks: I guess I overproofed my loaf (the second rise) and when I turned it over onto the hot baking sheet it just became very flat. However, with the high temperature and all, it rose and there were all those air bubbles inside too! Due to this flattening I got a giant loaf which I had to cut in four so that it fits into the freezer!

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Result: Crumbly though quite thick this white bread from Italy will make great sandwiches and also impress everyone with its size! 🙂 You can tell that there’s more to it than just plain white flour from the meaty crumb and a somewhat different texture overall. The crust is chewy and there were no unbaked spots!

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

My new job is keeping me busy all the time but I can tell you one thing: I am in love with the city center once again! Walking from Nevsky to that spot where Fontanka and Neva meet each other, with the leaves falling and the clear air, almost touristless sights (too early) and bridges-bridges-bridges… Well, I love you St Pete!

Adding these recipes to Sweet, Sourdough and Country-specific collections.

G.

bread · German recipe · sourdough

Two Good Sourdough Bread Recipes

Sourdough Bread from www.hefe-und-mehr.de

Sourdough bread… for me it is the quintessence of ‘Russian food’. Along with kefir of course 🙂 Well, they do have the ‘wild yeast’ stage in common! And you can make both at home, by the way. I’m still making my kefir with this creamcheese recipe, just skipping the straining stage. And then enhancing it with a slice or two or an entire gorbushka (the butt piece of the loaf and the best piece too) of crusty sourdough bread. Here are two recipes – one of a ‘white’ bread for breakfast and the other of a ‘black’ bread for lunch and dinner.

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

I’ve been using this recipe for some time now, each time altering it but mostly making dark or ‘black’ bread with it. The recipe is perfect for those who are only beginning to bake sourdough bread. But it is also just fine for those who need a basic recipe easy to remember and a procedure easy to follow.

Sourdough Bread from www.hefe-und-mehr.de

A year ago – Three Times Chocolate: Danish Swirl Bread, Panforte and Cookies

Two years ago – Sablé aux figues or Fig Jam Shortbread

Three years ago – Pommes. Pommes de Terre too

Sourdough Bread adapted from www.hefe-und-mehr.de is a super recipe which leaves you so many ways to explore! For the entire recipe and detailed instructions, visit the link above.

My changes: I usually increase the amount of rye flour, add whole wheat flour, rye bran, seeds, etc etc. As for the procedure, I normally bake the bread a bit longer at the highest temperature, cause I really like it crusty!

Sourdough Bread from www.hefe-und-mehr.de

Remarks: I usually mix the starter in the evening, leaving it to ferment overnight, then proceed with the recipe next day. Also tried leaving the rising dough in the fridge and it baked wonderfully. The only problem here is that the dough sticks to the ‘basket’ (I’m using heavily floured glass bowl) so that when you turn it over, the top of the loaf gets damaged a bit. But this you can always remedy with a cross slash 🙂

Result: The crumb is thick and particularly chewy if you add seeds. The procedure is easy and flexible and the recipe is super-adaptable. Each time the bread is somewhat different although the recipe stays the same.

***

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

And here’s the ‘white’ bread, although it would have been whiter if I hadn’t added quite a lot of whole wheat flour and hadn’t used rye sourdough culture. However, this is still ‘white’ to my mind, so we’re eating it for breakfast. Made huge goryachie buterbrody (hot sandwiches) with this bread, mmm! I know, I know, this is all very cheap gourmandise but I like those microwaved sandwiches with cheese and herbes de Provence on top 🙂

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule adapted from  www.ashaggydoughstory.com will make two big loaves that slice perfectly to make tasty buterbrod! The original recipe (follow the link above) will give you all the necessary instructions.

My changes: Used 4-cereal mix (barley, oats, wheat and rye) instead of just plain oats. My sourdough culture is made with only rye flour so the result was darker than what it should be with the white flour culture. Also couldn’t resist the temptation to add about 500 g whole wheat flour instead of all-white flour. For the want of covered bakers I used a cast iron pan and a pan covered with aluminum foil. I also baked my loaves a bit longer.

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Remarks: The procedure is quite flexible so you can adapt it to your lifestyle so to say. The recipe makes quite large loaves so you might want to freeze one once it gets completely cool (I normally do that).

Result: This bread tastes great and looks great – with this swirly slash on top. Don’t mind the oats that will fall off 🙂 Just enjoy the chewy yet soft sourdough bread: crusty with airy crumb!

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

I’ve posted some more oatmeal bread recently. Adding these two recipes to Sourdough bread collection.

G.

bread · British recipe · pies · vegetarian

Rolling Pin Recipes: Flatbread, Pie and Sweet Buns

Orange Sweet Rolls from www.melskitchencafe.com

Recently I’ve made these three recipes in one go and then realized I accidentally chose recipes requiring a rolling pin. Interestingly, they also constitute an all-round meal – you will roll out pastry for the pie, even roll the bread and roll-unroll the dessert! Here’s a rolling pin recipe digest, quite international as it often happens with what I cook: a British, a Lebanese and an American. We’ll start with the pie.

Cauliflower cheese tart from www.bbcgoodfood.com

See the cauliflower? I used to hate it… But then, I used to not eat lots of things I’m enjoying now. But they all belong to the vegetarian categories 🙂

A year ago – Midsummer Roses in Pavlovsk and Almond Puff

Two years ago – Russian Cold Summer Soup Okroshka and St Petersburg Sky and All That Bread

Three years ago – Sourdough Bread with Dates and Flaxseeds

Cauliflower Cheese Tart adapted from www.bbcgoodfood.com will make a soft and cheesy pie with a sort of white sauce / béchamel and vegetable filling. For some reason the recipe is no longer available on BBC Good Food so I’m giving you an external link where the original recipe has been preserved.

Changes: I used frozen cauliflower, already broken into florets, which I thawed beforehand. Instead of cheddar (and Parmesan) I used some cheese (recently I’m very dissatisfied with what we get here in Russia…) + threw in leftover cooked millet (I didn’t add any extra flavour or anything – just boosted the nutritional value). I had no mustard, so added khmeli-suneli (Georgian herbs + pepper mix) and Provence salt (salt mixed with herbes de Provence).

As for the pastry, I used this recipe from mycookinggallery.blogspot.com which give you even more than you’ll need for a standard pie. A pretty successful pastry recipe! I didn’t mind the extra pastry around the edges but you might consider trimming them for finer looks.

I had to bake my pie longer, also several minutes on the top shelf so that it browns a bit.

Cauliflower cheese tart from www.bbcgoodfood.com

Remarks: The pie without the mustard is quite plain and I would suggest seasoning the cauliflower-cheese mixture well in any case. I would also add some green onion or basil, to brighten it up a bit. My Dad was also not happy with the extra dough on the sides, but then – nobody’s perfect 🙂

Result: Almost soufflé-like vegetarian pie, soft but holding its shape perfectly. Although this tart requires some amount of cooking before you actually bake it, I think it’s worth it. It’s not what I usually make any way and once in a while one needs some sophistication 🙂

Man'oushe from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Man’oushe or Lebanese Flatbread adapted from www.ashaggydoughstory.com will make very soft white bread. Go to the link to see the entire recipe and the story behind it.

Changes: Instead of cake flour I used plain flour + some cornstarch. I forgot to add salt… Was actually a bit surprised the recipe did not ask for it 🙂 though it did, as it turned out later. I also mixed up the process a bit, by rolling the dough before the second rise. As I did not have anything near the required “wild thyme spread” I mixed some olive oil + dried thyme + coarse salt. I baked all four flatbreads simultaneously so they required more time (had to switch the racks).

Man'oushe from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Remarks: Most of the herbs will inevitably fall off but no worries, cause the oil + salt will remain. I froze these: flatbread is just the best option cause you can stack them on top of each other in the freezer.

Result: Very soft for flatbread! This recipe is very flexible as the author indicates – so push your imagination button 🙂

Orange Sweet Rolls from www.melskitchencafe.com

And now some sweetness with these orange-y orange spirals!

Orange Sweet Rolls adapted from www.melskitchencafe.com will make soft but chewy buns which are just perfect for those who love eating them… unrolled! 🙂

I added less salt and butter to the dough. To make warm buttermilk, I mixed kefir with hot water.

As for the filling, I used less sugar and less butter, also de-constructing it a bit by first spreading butter over the dough and then adding the sugar + orange zest mixture. And yes, I completely forgot to add the orange juice! So instead I used it as glaze (I skipped the glaze suggested by the author).

I tried twisting them (the original recipe will give you all the explanations) but they just wouldn’t hold the shape when rising. As I was making three recipes at a time, I had to postpone the baking of these rolls and so left them rising for even longer time. But apart from becoming quite puffy and touching each other, it did not hurt them. I baked my buns less than the indicated 22 minutes, they started browning too much.

   Orange Sweet Rolls from www.melskitchencafe.com

Remarks: My buns were not very sweet, so if you dare, add the entire cup of sugar into the filling. Bet they will create even more sugary syrup and turn into true sticky buns! Mother likes eating snail buns by un-snailing them – and these are very fine rolls for that!

Result: Super flavourful when baking, super-sunny when ready, these rolls are really nice and tasty! The filling is very orange-y, bright-looking and positively appetizing!

Orange Sweet Rolls from www.melskitchencafe.com

Adding these recipes to my Lunch / Dinner, Yeast Bread, Sweet and Country-specific (the first Lebanese recipe!) collections.

G.

bread · sweet

Double-Decker Gooseberry Scones and Muesli Rolls

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

Here’s another attempt at sharing with you some of the recipes I’ve recently made and liked – they’ve been impatiently waiting to get posted all this time! Both recipes in today’s post are made with whole wheat flour: scones filled with jam and rolls full of seeds. Let’s start with the dessert 🙂

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

A year ago – Easy Cheesy Biscuits for Summer Picnic in St Petersburg

Two years ago – Khachapuri for the Bride’s Party

Three years ago – Some Desserts from Leftovers

Double-Decker Filled Scones adapted from www.kingarthurflour.com will make shortbread-like scones with sweet filling and moderately sweet dough. Follow the link to get the entire recipe.

My changes: Opted to mix in whole wheat flour as the original recipe suggests, added less salt but still the 50g sugar seemed not enough even with the sweetness of jam filling. I didn’t sprinkle the top of the scones with sugar but instead brushed them with jam. The procedure is somewhat more time-consuming than for scones without filling but there was nothing super-difficult.

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

Remarks: The filling part is very flexible – I chose homemade gooseberry jam which I thought would match these scones. I would flatten the dough more and probably add more filling cause these scones are baked in uncut rounds, which will rise in the oven. Thus I got lots of dough and not enough jam. Although I added whole wheat flour, I cannot say that it was very distinct, although the addition definitely changed the texture (see the close-up in the second picture from above).

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

Result: Real double-decker scones with a bit too much dough and runny filling (which you will also collect from the parchment paper as caramel). More like a huge shortbread cookie with filling, cut into wedges. By the way, can become your leftovers recipe for using up jam or some other filling! You will entertain yourself much more while making these then your usual scones 🙂 I thoroughly enjoyed the process on the balcony!

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

But what I obviously enjoyed even more was eating these extremely (!) tasty Muesli Rolls which were especially good when toasted, mmmmm! I just gobbled down several slices with nothing on them, just because they were sooooo good… They might not look very impressive with all the barley flakes fallen off but once you taste them, you will not pay much attention to the looks 🙂

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Muesli Rolls adapted from www.karenskitchenstories.com will make cute and really addictive buns with lots of seeds and other tasty stuff inside 🙂 As always – follow the link to read the original recipe.

My changes: Used barley flakes instead of oats, active dry instead of instant yeas, did not add molasses and so had to add more water. As for the ‘muesli’ part, I omitted walnuts, apricots and chocolate. I used barley flakes to decorate the tops but they almost all fell off. The procedure is easy (typical for leavened buns), though I decided to make less but bigger buns. I forgot to flatten the buns before their last rise and did not mist the tops with water before baking. As my buns were larger, I had to increase baking time a bit.

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Remarks: With all their seeds and stuff, these buns are not very crumbly, so will make for a very good breakfast option. Don’t know what they will turn into with chocolate (!), although you can see them looking pretty with apricots here, but sure enough they will still be great! So if you are in for sweeter buns, go ahead and try adding more of the ‘muesli’ ingredients.

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Result: Try these muesli rolls toasted… although they are super-addictive even just plain, beware! And enjoy the chewiness at its most with every bite!

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Adding these recipes to Yeast Bread and Sweet collections.

G.