Family recipe · sourdough

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Last weekend I experimented with spelt flour which I had never used before in baking. I drew upon my basic sourdough recipe which I use most of the weekends when baking black bread for my family. I also use it for baking so-called white bread as well. So you can almost call it a family recipe now.

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

I cannot say that the whole-grain spelt flour added in rather small amounts in relation to the bulk of all purpose flour brought in some specific flavour. Also, there was my sourdough culture which is rye.

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

So in the end,  the baguettes had quite a dense crumb with a general whole-grainy look and flavour. But that flavour they had for sure!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

1 year ago – Spring in St Petersburg. The Beginning
2 years ago – Stirato or Italian Baguettes
3 years ago – 2,800 km of Russia Seen from Above
4 years ago – What a Peach! Sunny Cake and a Zesty Cranberry Cake
5 years ago – Pane al Cioccolato… Senza Cioccolato

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes adapted from basic sourdough bread recipe originally adapted from Darnitsky bread recipe

Ingredients:

For the starter:

  • 1 Tb rye sourdough starter from the fridge
  • 100 g water
  • 100 g rye flour

For the bread:

  • 200-220 g of water
  • 150 g spelt flour
  • 200 g all purpose flour, more if needed
  • 1 tsp salt
  • pumpkin seeds

Procedure:

Take a tablespoon of sourdough starter from the fridge and mix it with 100 g of water and 100 of rye flour, then leave it overnight.

In the morning when your starter has puffed up, add 200-220 g of water, 150 g spelt flour and 200 g all purpose flour, salt and pumpkin seeds. You should get quite thick though sticky dough so keep adding all purpose flour as needed. You should be able to fold the dough. Leave it covered for more than one hour, making at least one fold in between (if it’s too sticky, use either more flour or water your hands). Now you can either flour a glass bowl or a proofing basket, shape the bread into a round loaf, flour it and place it in the bowl, cover and leave to rise for an hour. Alternatively, you can make baguettes by dividing the dough in two and then folding and rolling each part to create 2 baguettes, place them on paper / baking mat, then cover and leave the shaped dough to rise for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 225 ‘C with a pan / tray on the bottom to create steam and a reversed tray in the middle (as a sort of baking stone). Reverse the loaf onto a baking mat / paper, make several slashes and slide it onto the hot tray / slash the baguettes diagonally and slide them onto the reversed tray together with the paper. Pour some water into the pan on the bottom to create steam. I usually do not change the temperature but if I see that the loaf is browning too much, I might decrease the temperature or move it to a lower rack. The baking takes from 30-35 minutes for the baguettes to 45-50 for a loaf.

Remarks: I tried hard to shape these baguettes, working the dough quite a lot by folding and rolling and re-rolling, and they puffed up nicely in the oven, also growing quite chewy crust.

Result: Flavourful and chewy. You might not tell at once that they are made with spelt flour but these baguettes are perfect for breakfast. Pumpkin seeds are good too!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Here pictured with the precious Piave cheese from Italy’s Veneto region:

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

It was a pretty Sunday morning and I took a lot of photos of the baguettes. I also spotted this thingy here which is a projector for silent cinema reels we have of me and my sister. My Mother is being busy converting the films into megabytes of me and my sister doing the pretty mundane things – without a sound 🙂 Yes, sometimes I do feel I was born way earlier than what my passport claims!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Adding this post to my Sourdough Bread collection.

G.

bread · Greek recipe

Koulouri Thessalonikis, Take 2

Koulouri Thessalonikis

This is a take 2 of trying to reproduce the wonderful bread rings called koulouri: street food, breakfast food, snack food, these rings are sold all over the place in Thessaloniki, Greece. Of course I’ve done many more attempts over these years but the result has never been nearly as good.

Koulouri Thessalonikis

And hooray, now there’s a video of this recipe that you can watch (there was a request for that in one of the comments to the take 1)! I’m sure there’ll be no problem with it being in Greek as you might as well just try to reproduce the movements of the baker with the help of the recipe that follows. Here’s the video from the SKAI’s Chef on Air TV program – start watching from 3:55 if you don’t know Greek.

Koulouri Thessalonikis

The first koulouri I posted on this blog back in 2012 was with a slightly different recipe. I think overall those first koulouria (plural for koulouri) looked more authentic but almost 5 years later there’s no way I can actually compare the two recipe other than by appearance.

Koulouri Thessalonikis

1 year ago – Whole Wheat Fig Bars

2 years ago – How to Make Silky Cream Cheese at Home

3 years ago – Apricot Oatmeal Bar With Pistachios

4 years ago – After Apples Come the Berries

5 years ago – 2 Energy-Boosting Sweets to Keep Your Mind and Spirit Up

Koulouri Thessalonikis or ΚΟΥΛΟΥΡΙ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΗΣ adapted from chefonair.gr will make a dozen of soft and a tad sweet bread rings. I’ve made several changes to the original recipe which included filling the rings with chocolate cream cheese.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 kg all purpose flour
  • 4 Tbs seed oil – I used olive oil
  • 1 Tbs salt – I used less
  • 1/2 cup lukewarm water for the dough – I needed more
  • 2 Tbs sunflower seed oil for brushing the baking sheet – I used paper / baking mat
  • 2 cups lukewarm water for the sugary water – I cut this in half
  • 1 cup sugar for the sugary water – I cut this in half
  • 2 cups sesame seeds – I had too little of these (be generous!)
  • 3 Tbs flour for the yeast
  • 15 g fresh yeast – too lazy to check the yeast conversion website, I put in a bit of instant yeast (it should have been 1.76  tsp of instant yeast or 2.65  tsp of active dry yeast)
  • 1/2 cups lukewarm water for the yeast
  • 2 Tbs sugar for the yeast – I used a bit of honey

Procedure:

Pour lukewarm water into a bowl and dissolve the fresh yeast with the 2 Tbs of sugar. Add 3 Tbs of flour and mix. Cover with plastic foil and leave to rise for 30 minutes at room temperature.

(The original recipe asked for the mixer) Place the flour, the yeast mixture, the oil, the water and the salt to a big bowl and start kneading (3 minutes with the mixer running at low speed and then 5 minutes more at high, a bit longer by hand). Cover the bowl with a towel / plastic foil and leave to rest for 30 minutes and then knead again (5 minutes with a mixer, longer by hand).

Divide the dough into 15-18 pieces (I made 12 balls) and roll each piece into a rope about 30 cm long. Mix sugar with lukewarm water in a plate to create sugary water (it helps keep almost all the sesame seeds on place and adds some colour). Dip the ropes first into the sugary water and then into sesame seeds (place them on a shallow plate: I would suggest keeping some as a reserve because they stick so well and disappear pretty fast). Pinch the two edges to create a ring. Place the koulouria on a greased baking sheet (or line your sheet with parchment paper / baking mat), leaving space between them as they will puff up. Cover with a towel / plastic foil and leave to rise for 30 minutes (my first batch was rising for a bit longer already shaped while the second was rising longer as dough balls).

Bake in the preheated oven at 170’C for 15-20 minutes (mine took 20 minutes).

Koulouri Thessalonikis

Remarks: You can see how naked the second batch looks, as I was running out of the sesame seeds… For this recipe you do need quite a lot of them if you want a really authentic look and taste! And by the way, with the sugary water trick these seeds do not come off as massively as they would with dipping them in just plain water.

Koulouri Thessalonikis

The second batch also looks more browned as I was using a black baking mat for these. It’s a pity today on such a beautiful snowy winter day there’s not much light so the koulouria look rather blueish. Which they don’t 🙂

Koulouri Thessalonikis

I added less sugar to the dough and a bit less salt and still I think the crumb tastes pretty salty which comes into contrast with the slightly sweet outside thanks to the sugary water.

Koulouri Thessalonikis

Result: These traditional Greek bred rings are soft and chewy. I would eat them plain or with cheese and salad – although the original recipe suggests slicing them and filling them with chocolate. Which I imagine is also nice as bread is multipurpose!

Koulouri Thessalonikis

As for the crumb, koulouri is much softer than its Russian counterpart bublik (which has a dense crumb and poppy seeds instead of sesame). Bublik is also larger and thicker, with a more browned surface. Gosh, I love both 🙂

Koulouri Thessalonikis

By the way, all in the mood of the first Saturday of the month when we participate in the local recycling activity, I recycled the sugary water into a berry coffee cake. Worked out just fine.

Koulouri Thessalonikis

This post goes to the by Country and the Yeast Bread collections.

G.

bread · sourdough

Improvising with Sourdough Bread or Being Lazy?

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

I’ve grown lazy enough these days to start baking without a recipe. This concerns both bread and sweet things. Not all of my free-baking experiments are successful but I guess I get some extra pleasure from those which do happen to be successful. And there’s always this risky feeling of experimenting which I do enjoy!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

So what I do is feed my rye sourdough culture with rye flour + water and then after an overnight rest I divide it and use the larger amount for the rye bread and a smaller for white bread. Sometimes if I just need some white bread, I feed the culture with white flour.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Thanks to the now mature sourdough culture (been using it since 2011) I usually do no add any yeast, but this time I wanted a more ‘fluffy’ result with my white bread, so I added a bit of instant yeast to the dough. I also tend to overload my bread with seeds and bran, so sometimes it all results in quite a dense and moist crumb, just like this time when I also added rye malt:

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Oh, breaking this just-out-of-the-oven bread is so very tantalizing!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Of course the rye version which I make with rye flour + all-purpose / whole-wheat flour does not rise as much in the oven – although it does rise a lot before baking, as this rye flour is so very reactive!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

If you’re looking for a perfect sourdough bread recipe, it doesn’t exist. I mean, you should probably just figure it our for yourself. I ‘created’ mine out of Darnitsky bread recipe which I’ve been using for quite a long time already.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

For me, the best formula is to take several tablespoons of sourdough culture from the fridge, feed it with about 200 g of water and 200 of rye flour, then leave it overnight. At this point you can either split it for two breads or make one large loaf. Then I add about 200 g of water, 200 g or more of rye flour, more or less the same amount of white flour, salt, various extras like wheat, oat or rye bran, coriander, sunflower, pumpkin or flax seeds, oatmeal, rye malt, sometimes honey etc. I try to achieve a sort of thickish dough so that it will keep the shape, if it’s going to be rye bread it will be sticky but you should be able to fold it and almost knead it. I then leave it covered for more than an hour, sometimes I make several folds and leave it for some more time to rest (rise). I then flour a glass bowl, shape the bread into a round loaf, flour it and place it in the bowl. Alternatively, I make rolls if I see that the dough (usually with more white flour than rye) is quite easy to shape. I leave it to rise for yet another hour covered and preheat the oven to 225 ‘C with a pan on the bottom (for steam) and a reversed tray in the middle (it acts as a baking stone for me). I then reverse the loaf onto a baking mat / paper, make several slashes and slide it onto the hot tray. I pour some water into the pan on the bottom to create steam (not much so that it evaporates and I don’t need to take the pan out during the baking). I usually do not change the temperature but if I see that the loaf is browning too much, I might decrease the temperature or move it to a lower rack. The baking takes from 25-30 minutes (for the rolls) to 45-50 for the loaf.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

This might not sound as a very precise formula but then this is what I call experimenting with the sourdough! You never know even with a perfect recipe whether your bread will come out right or not, because this living thing called sourdough culture can have its moods 🙂

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

What’s your personal sourdough bread formula?

Adding this post to Sourdough bread collection.

G.

bread · German recipe · sourdough

Two Good Sourdough Bread Recipes

Sourdough Bread from www.hefe-und-mehr.de

Sourdough bread… for me it is the quintessence of ‘Russian food’. Along with kefir of course 🙂 Well, they do have the ‘wild yeast’ stage in common! And you can make both at home, by the way. I’m still making my kefir with this creamcheese recipe, just skipping the straining stage. And then enhancing it with a slice or two or an entire gorbushka (the butt piece of the loaf and the best piece too) of crusty sourdough bread. Here are two recipes – one of a ‘white’ bread for breakfast and the other of a ‘black’ bread for lunch and dinner.

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

I’ve been using this recipe for some time now, each time altering it but mostly making dark or ‘black’ bread with it. The recipe is perfect for those who are only beginning to bake sourdough bread. But it is also just fine for those who need a basic recipe easy to remember and a procedure easy to follow.

Sourdough Bread from www.hefe-und-mehr.de

A year ago – Three Times Chocolate: Danish Swirl Bread, Panforte and Cookies

Two years ago – Sablé aux figues or Fig Jam Shortbread

Three years ago – Pommes. Pommes de Terre too

Sourdough Bread adapted from www.hefe-und-mehr.de is a super recipe which leaves you so many ways to explore! For the entire recipe and detailed instructions, visit the link above.

My changes: I usually increase the amount of rye flour, add whole wheat flour, rye bran, seeds, etc etc. As for the procedure, I normally bake the bread a bit longer at the highest temperature, cause I really like it crusty!

Sourdough Bread from www.hefe-und-mehr.de

Remarks: I usually mix the starter in the evening, leaving it to ferment overnight, then proceed with the recipe next day. Also tried leaving the rising dough in the fridge and it baked wonderfully. The only problem here is that the dough sticks to the ‘basket’ (I’m using heavily floured glass bowl) so that when you turn it over, the top of the loaf gets damaged a bit. But this you can always remedy with a cross slash 🙂

Result: The crumb is thick and particularly chewy if you add seeds. The procedure is easy and flexible and the recipe is super-adaptable. Each time the bread is somewhat different although the recipe stays the same.

***

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

And here’s the ‘white’ bread, although it would have been whiter if I hadn’t added quite a lot of whole wheat flour and hadn’t used rye sourdough culture. However, this is still ‘white’ to my mind, so we’re eating it for breakfast. Made huge goryachie buterbrody (hot sandwiches) with this bread, mmm! I know, I know, this is all very cheap gourmandise but I like those microwaved sandwiches with cheese and herbes de Provence on top 🙂

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule adapted from  www.ashaggydoughstory.com will make two big loaves that slice perfectly to make tasty buterbrod! The original recipe (follow the link above) will give you all the necessary instructions.

My changes: Used 4-cereal mix (barley, oats, wheat and rye) instead of just plain oats. My sourdough culture is made with only rye flour so the result was darker than what it should be with the white flour culture. Also couldn’t resist the temptation to add about 500 g whole wheat flour instead of all-white flour. For the want of covered bakers I used a cast iron pan and a pan covered with aluminum foil. I also baked my loaves a bit longer.

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Remarks: The procedure is quite flexible so you can adapt it to your lifestyle so to say. The recipe makes quite large loaves so you might want to freeze one once it gets completely cool (I normally do that).

Result: This bread tastes great and looks great – with this swirly slash on top. Don’t mind the oats that will fall off 🙂 Just enjoy the chewy yet soft sourdough bread: crusty with airy crumb!

Rolled Oat Sourdough Boule from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

I’ve posted some more oatmeal bread recently. Adding these two recipes to Sourdough bread collection.

G.

bread · sweet

Double-Decker Gooseberry Scones and Muesli Rolls

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

Here’s another attempt at sharing with you some of the recipes I’ve recently made and liked – they’ve been impatiently waiting to get posted all this time! Both recipes in today’s post are made with whole wheat flour: scones filled with jam and rolls full of seeds. Let’s start with the dessert 🙂

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

A year ago – Easy Cheesy Biscuits for Summer Picnic in St Petersburg

Two years ago – Khachapuri for the Bride’s Party

Three years ago – Some Desserts from Leftovers

Double-Decker Filled Scones adapted from www.kingarthurflour.com will make shortbread-like scones with sweet filling and moderately sweet dough. Follow the link to get the entire recipe.

My changes: Opted to mix in whole wheat flour as the original recipe suggests, added less salt but still the 50g sugar seemed not enough even with the sweetness of jam filling. I didn’t sprinkle the top of the scones with sugar but instead brushed them with jam. The procedure is somewhat more time-consuming than for scones without filling but there was nothing super-difficult.

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

Remarks: The filling part is very flexible – I chose homemade gooseberry jam which I thought would match these scones. I would flatten the dough more and probably add more filling cause these scones are baked in uncut rounds, which will rise in the oven. Thus I got lots of dough and not enough jam. Although I added whole wheat flour, I cannot say that it was very distinct, although the addition definitely changed the texture (see the close-up in the second picture from above).

Double-Decker Filled Scones from www.kingarthurflour.com

Result: Real double-decker scones with a bit too much dough and runny filling (which you will also collect from the parchment paper as caramel). More like a huge shortbread cookie with filling, cut into wedges. By the way, can become your leftovers recipe for using up jam or some other filling! You will entertain yourself much more while making these then your usual scones 🙂 I thoroughly enjoyed the process on the balcony!

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

But what I obviously enjoyed even more was eating these extremely (!) tasty Muesli Rolls which were especially good when toasted, mmmmm! I just gobbled down several slices with nothing on them, just because they were sooooo good… They might not look very impressive with all the barley flakes fallen off but once you taste them, you will not pay much attention to the looks 🙂

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Muesli Rolls adapted from www.karenskitchenstories.com will make cute and really addictive buns with lots of seeds and other tasty stuff inside 🙂 As always – follow the link to read the original recipe.

My changes: Used barley flakes instead of oats, active dry instead of instant yeas, did not add molasses and so had to add more water. As for the ‘muesli’ part, I omitted walnuts, apricots and chocolate. I used barley flakes to decorate the tops but they almost all fell off. The procedure is easy (typical for leavened buns), though I decided to make less but bigger buns. I forgot to flatten the buns before their last rise and did not mist the tops with water before baking. As my buns were larger, I had to increase baking time a bit.

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Remarks: With all their seeds and stuff, these buns are not very crumbly, so will make for a very good breakfast option. Don’t know what they will turn into with chocolate (!), although you can see them looking pretty with apricots here, but sure enough they will still be great! So if you are in for sweeter buns, go ahead and try adding more of the ‘muesli’ ingredients.

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Result: Try these muesli rolls toasted… although they are super-addictive even just plain, beware! And enjoy the chewiness at its most with every bite!

Muesli Rolls from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Adding these recipes to Yeast Bread and Sweet collections.

G.

bread · British recipe · Italian recipe · sourdough

Italian, American, Scottish: Bread Recipes with Oatmeal

 PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

Browsing through the to-be-posted-one-day backlog I found out I’ve somehow collected three bread recipes which require oatmeal. Here’s an Italian, a Scottish and an American recipe, all three very different (sourdough bread, yeast bread and quick rolls) but reunited here to celebrate the oatmeal 🙂

PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

As a sourdough bread recipe will inevitably require more time, let’s start with the Italian one. Although time-demanding this recipe is rather easy to make. And definitely very oaty, I would say, surprisingly so for an Italian bread recipe and also for a recipe using just oat flour and not the oatmeal!

PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

A year ago – Neverending Strasbourg and Chocolate Marble Bread

Two years ago – Khachapuri and Bread with Herbs

Three years ago – Fragrant Apple and Pear Tart

Pane di avena a lievitazione naturale or Sourdough Oat Bread translated and adapted from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com will make a small, crumbly loaf with chewy crust and oats oats oats 🙂 See my remarks in italics. ATTENTION: requires an overnight rest.

Ingredients:

  • 100 g of active sourdough culture – I used my rye sourdough culture
  • 260 g of flour (originally Italian O type)
  • 240 g oat flour – I grounded oats plus 4-grain cereal (rye, oats, wheat and barley flakes)
  • 350 g water at room t’
  • pinch of salt

Procedure:

The evening before the bake day dissolve your sourdough culture in water, add the flours and salt, mix with a fork to get a ‘grainy’ dough. Cover with plastic and leave to rise until morning.

The next day proceed with the dough: invert the dough on a floured surface and form a rectangle, folding it from sides to the center so that each fold overlaps the other. Repeat the folds, shape into a boule and then place it in a floured basket (I use a floured glass bowl, also flouring the dough well) seam side down, cover and leave to rise for 2 hours.

Invert the dough into a pan lined with parchment paper and make two slashes across the top. Bake in the oven preheated to 200°C for at least 30 minutes until the bread is ready.

PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

Remarks: I think this bread needs more salt, cause a pinch just doesn’t make a difference. Probably it would be better to add about a teaspoon of salt after the overnight rise.

Result: Very crumbly and very oaty! Something to chew on for the breakfast – will substitute a bowlful of hot oatmeal! This bread has the most of the oatmeal flavour and texture out of the three recipes I’m sharing with you.

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Our next recipe (in the chronological order as I baked it) for oat-lovers is although an yeast one will actually require more effort from your side cause it has all the braiding and the ‘seeding’ to it. So here’s an American oatmeal bread recipe:

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Crunchy Seed Braid adapted from www.ashaggydoughstory.com (originally adapted from King Arthur Flour) will make a super seed-loaded braid. Go to the link to see the entire recipes and all the helpful remarks (or go straight to the source recipe).

My changes: No surprise that I decided to load this bread up even more with the grains and bran, adding more wholewheat flour and using 4-grain cereal (rye, oats, wheat and barley flakes) instead of grains blend. And the dry milk one buys here in Russia is definitely far from being nonfat… I left my dough rising for more than the indicated 90 minutes.

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Remarks: I made a looooong braid but as the author suggests you can make a shorter and probably softer version. I did not use the damp towel method, but instead immersed the dough ropes in the water (as I saw done at the Greek bakery) and then sprinkled seeds on top.  Whatever method you use, this bread will in any case have lots of seeds inside!

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Result: Seed-overload 🙂 A bit too dry – which is a natural consequence of so many seeds, of course. The oats do not have a very particular effect on this bread but add to the overall crunchiness. Very good breakfast option!

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

And finally the Scottish oatmeal bread recipe. There’s Irish Soda bread and there’s at least two Scottish recipes that I know which ask for oatmeal – those thin oatmeal cookies and these super-quick bread rolls:

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Baps, Scottish Morning Rolls adapted from www.lavenderandlovage.com will make the most flavourful buns you ever take out of your oven! Although I tweaked them up a bit, this is yet another recipe for the oatmeal fans. Visit the original website to see the entire recipe.

My changes: As I was lazy enough to ground more oatmeal, I used the already grounded barley flakes + oat bran. I did not use milk, instead recycled water from cooking millet.

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Remarks: You will get a whole tray of buns but as they are pretty small and what’s more important pretty tasty, you might consider doubling the recipe. I’m also quite sure this dough will work well as a more healthy pizza dough or pie dough. When the dough rises it might look a bit too ‘grainy’ but once baked and sliced, the rolls are super-soft, so I guess the same will apply if you use the dough for pizza or pies.

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Result: These baps are super flavourful when they are just out of the oven, filling your kitchen with a bakery-like atmosphere. And with all that they are also super easy and fast! It’s thus quite fair to call them morning rolls as you might make them before breakfast (well, in theory 🙂 The oat texture is not very distinct but these rolls are no doubt more ‘interesting’ texture-wise than their all-purpose flour counterparts.

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Adding this post to my Sourdough, Yeast bread and Country-specific recipe collections.

G.

bread · Italian recipe · sourdough

Addictive Grissini and Sourdough Bread Twists

Grissini (Thin Bread Sticks) from www.wildyeastblog.com

Hungry for some breadsticks? Here are two recipes which will give you a mountain – not kidding! – of truly addictive breadsticks: an easier chewy Italian recipe and a soft chewy but more time-consuming sourdough one. Be ready for both mountains to disappear very fast leaving nothing but some breadcrumbs…

Grissini (Thin Bread Sticks) from www.wildyeastblog.com

A year ago – Pear Clafoutis, Jelly Muffins and Scandinavian Twists

Two years ago – Colours of Summer

Three years ago – Short Post on Short Crusty Baguettes

Grissini or Thin Bread Sticks from Italy adapted from www.wildyeastblog.com will make a lot of crunchy salty breadsticks. I made twice recipe twice as it turned out – each time it was a 100% success! Visit the link above to get the entire recipe.

My changes: As for the topping, I sprinkled some of the breadsticks with pepper and some with the authentic herbes de Provence.

Grissini (Thin Bread Sticks) from www.wildyeastblog.com

Remarks: The procedure might seem a bit lengthy due to the extended rising time and several batches to bake but then it doesn’t require your immediate participation 🙂 Moreover these breadsticks are baking really fast, mine were ready in just about 20 minutes! When you are choosing the topping, make sure it is not “heavy” or just big – most of herbes de Provence just fell off although I mixed them into the olive oil. The grissini will be too thin for seeds either.

Result: Very addictive crunchy-crusty super-long breadsticks. The thinner you make them, the better, mmmm. Don’t be mislead by the photos – you will get really a mountain of them. It’s just that my camera battery died before I baked them all. And when I came back home some days ago, all that was left is pictured in the second photo…

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

The second breadstick recipe requires sourdough starter. I actually chose it cause my starter needed feeding while I had not much time to bake a proper sourdough bread. And here was this recipe which, although asking for a 6 hour rise, did not demand more than a usual breadstick recipe later on – and so I managed to bake it in one day. By the way, if you’re not ready to bake immediately, you can refrigerate the levain up to 24 hours which is handy.

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Sourdough Bread Twists adapted from www.karenskitchenstories.com will make super-long soft and chewy breadsticks with all those seeds actually NOT falling off 🙂 The recipe with all the instructions can be found at the link above.

My changes: I used my rye sourdough starter which I fed with all purpose flour (this added some color and an extra hint of rye flavour to the dough) and rye flour instead of pumpernickel flour. I added the required active dry yeast, although I am quite confident with the rising power of my sourdough alone. I was not sure about throwing in the entire 2 tablespoons of salt, so I used less and also skipped the extra salt for sprinkling. But after tasting the breadsticks I can say that they could have benefited from more salt. I didn’t brush the breadsticks once baked with oil either.

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Remarks: These breadsticks got a little bit tricky cause the combined power of sourdough and yeast made them all puffy. My breadsticks thus were really long (I had to bake them in two batches) and rather thick. They also were on the verge of falling from the baking sheet but I managed to stuff them into the oven 🙂 My first batch was all soft and chewy while the second one was crustier.

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Result: The combination of the tangy sourdough flavour and the chewiness of the seeds is something you don’t get from grissini. These are more on the soft side, though the thinner you make these, the crunchier they’ll get. Add salt according to your taste but be careful – these twists are also addictive and you can end up eating them all…

Adding these to my Yeast Bread, Sourdough and Country-specific recipe collections. You can also check out this extra-salty breadstick recipe.

G.