Family recipe · sourdough

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Last weekend I experimented with spelt flour which I had never used before in baking. I drew upon my basic sourdough recipe which I use most of the weekends when baking black bread for my family. I also use it for baking so-called white bread as well. So you can almost call it a family recipe now.

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

I cannot say that the whole-grain spelt flour added in rather small amounts in relation to the bulk of all purpose flour brought in some specific flavour. Also, there was my sourdough culture which is rye.

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

So in the end,  the baguettes had quite a dense crumb with a general whole-grainy look and flavour. But that flavour they had for sure!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

1 year ago – Spring in St Petersburg. The Beginning
2 years ago – Stirato or Italian Baguettes
3 years ago – 2,800 km of Russia Seen from Above
4 years ago – What a Peach! Sunny Cake and a Zesty Cranberry Cake
5 years ago – Pane al Cioccolato… Senza Cioccolato

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes adapted from basic sourdough bread recipe originally adapted from Darnitsky bread recipe

Ingredients:

For the starter:

  • 1 Tb rye sourdough starter from the fridge
  • 100 g water
  • 100 g rye flour

For the bread:

  • 200-220 g of water
  • 150 g spelt flour
  • 200 g all purpose flour, more if needed
  • 1 tsp salt
  • pumpkin seeds

Procedure:

Take a tablespoon of sourdough starter from the fridge and mix it with 100 g of water and 100 of rye flour, then leave it overnight.

In the morning when your starter has puffed up, add 200-220 g of water, 150 g spelt flour and 200 g all purpose flour, salt and pumpkin seeds. You should get quite thick though sticky dough so keep adding all purpose flour as needed. You should be able to fold the dough. Leave it covered for more than one hour, making at least one fold in between (if it’s too sticky, use either more flour or water your hands). Now you can either flour a glass bowl or a proofing basket, shape the bread into a round loaf, flour it and place it in the bowl, cover and leave to rise for an hour. Alternatively, you can make baguettes by dividing the dough in two and then folding and rolling each part to create 2 baguettes, place them on paper / baking mat, then cover and leave the shaped dough to rise for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 225 ‘C with a pan / tray on the bottom to create steam and a reversed tray in the middle (as a sort of baking stone). Reverse the loaf onto a baking mat / paper, make several slashes and slide it onto the hot tray / slash the baguettes diagonally and slide them onto the reversed tray together with the paper. Pour some water into the pan on the bottom to create steam. I usually do not change the temperature but if I see that the loaf is browning too much, I might decrease the temperature or move it to a lower rack. The baking takes from 30-35 minutes for the baguettes to 45-50 for a loaf.

Remarks: I tried hard to shape these baguettes, working the dough quite a lot by folding and rolling and re-rolling, and they puffed up nicely in the oven, also growing quite chewy crust.

Result: Flavourful and chewy. You might not tell at once that they are made with spelt flour but these baguettes are perfect for breakfast. Pumpkin seeds are good too!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Here pictured with the precious Piave cheese from Italy’s Veneto region:

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

It was a pretty Sunday morning and I took a lot of photos of the baguettes. I also spotted this thingy here which is a projector for silent cinema reels we have of me and my sister. My Mother is being busy converting the films into megabytes of me and my sister doing the pretty mundane things – without a sound 🙂 Yes, sometimes I do feel I was born way earlier than what my passport claims!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Adding this post to my Sourdough Bread collection.

G.

bread · sourdough

Improvising with Sourdough Bread or Being Lazy?

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

I’ve grown lazy enough these days to start baking without a recipe. This concerns both bread and sweet things. Not all of my free-baking experiments are successful but I guess I get some extra pleasure from those which do happen to be successful. And there’s always this risky feeling of experimenting which I do enjoy!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

So what I do is feed my rye sourdough culture with rye flour + water and then after an overnight rest I divide it and use the larger amount for the rye bread and a smaller for white bread. Sometimes if I just need some white bread, I feed the culture with white flour.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Thanks to the now mature sourdough culture (been using it since 2011) I usually do no add any yeast, but this time I wanted a more ‘fluffy’ result with my white bread, so I added a bit of instant yeast to the dough. I also tend to overload my bread with seeds and bran, so sometimes it all results in quite a dense and moist crumb, just like this time when I also added rye malt:

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Oh, breaking this just-out-of-the-oven bread is so very tantalizing!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Of course the rye version which I make with rye flour + all-purpose / whole-wheat flour does not rise as much in the oven – although it does rise a lot before baking, as this rye flour is so very reactive!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

If you’re looking for a perfect sourdough bread recipe, it doesn’t exist. I mean, you should probably just figure it our for yourself. I ‘created’ mine out of Darnitsky bread recipe which I’ve been using for quite a long time already.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

For me, the best formula is to take several tablespoons of sourdough culture from the fridge, feed it with about 200 g of water and 200 of rye flour, then leave it overnight. At this point you can either split it for two breads or make one large loaf. Then I add about 200 g of water, 200 g or more of rye flour, more or less the same amount of white flour, salt, various extras like wheat, oat or rye bran, coriander, sunflower, pumpkin or flax seeds, oatmeal, rye malt, sometimes honey etc. I try to achieve a sort of thickish dough so that it will keep the shape, if it’s going to be rye bread it will be sticky but you should be able to fold it and almost knead it. I then leave it covered for more than an hour, sometimes I make several folds and leave it for some more time to rest (rise). I then flour a glass bowl, shape the bread into a round loaf, flour it and place it in the bowl. Alternatively, I make rolls if I see that the dough (usually with more white flour than rye) is quite easy to shape. I leave it to rise for yet another hour covered and preheat the oven to 225 ‘C with a pan on the bottom (for steam) and a reversed tray in the middle (it acts as a baking stone for me). I then reverse the loaf onto a baking mat / paper, make several slashes and slide it onto the hot tray. I pour some water into the pan on the bottom to create steam (not much so that it evaporates and I don’t need to take the pan out during the baking). I usually do not change the temperature but if I see that the loaf is browning too much, I might decrease the temperature or move it to a lower rack. The baking takes from 25-30 minutes (for the rolls) to 45-50 for the loaf.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

This might not sound as a very precise formula but then this is what I call experimenting with the sourdough! You never know even with a perfect recipe whether your bread will come out right or not, because this living thing called sourdough culture can have its moods 🙂

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

What’s your personal sourdough bread formula?

Adding this post to Sourdough bread collection.

G.

pies · vegetarian

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs, Azerbaijani Pies with a Russian Twist

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs

Let’s have some savoury dish for a change. This time it’s going to be a recipe for Qutab from the Azerbaijani cuisine but with a certain Russian twist. I recently tried a similar fried filled bread from Turkey called gozleme traditionally made with white brine cheese. Both recipes are easy to make and do not require lengthy dough preparation. You can make them with meat or other fillings but I just love the cheese + herbs combination. For both recipes I used suluguni cheese mixed with some tvorog (cottage cheese) for the lack of proper brynza, and whatever is available from the fresh herbs.

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs

The Russian twist is ensured by the addition of rye flour to the dough. I doubt that in Azerbaijan they eat rye qutabs (rye flour is characteristic of the Northern parts of Russia rather than Azerbaijan!) but at the same time this adds some extra flavour (and a bit of wholesomeness) to the somewhat heavy dish. You might want to make a 100% white flour dough or mix in some whole wheat flour. Whatever your choice, heat your sturdy cast iron pan and let’s make the qutabs!

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs

1 year ago – Vyatka, City of Snow that Dreams of Summer

2 years ago – Two Spinach Pies and Spinach…Rice

3 years ago – French Bread

4 years ago – Two Rrrrrye Breads (Raisin and Riga)

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs translated and adapted from perfectfood.ru will make a chewy and vegetarian version of the Azerbaijani pies. Check out the original website for the video recipe (understandable even without any knowledge of Russian). See my remarks in italics.

Ingredients for 9-10 qutabs:

For the dough:

  • 150 g rye flour (can substitute with whole wheat or all-purpose flour)
  • 150 g all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 4 Tbs sunflower oil
  • water – as much as the dough will take

For the filling:

  • 100-150 g cheese, hard and /or soft (Adygea, brynza, paneer…) – I used fat-free cottage cheese and Suluguni
  • 300 g of herbs of any type, can use spinach, sorrel, nettle, etc. – I used dill, parsley, spring onions and coriander
  • salt, according to your cheese (I also added pepper)

For the sauce (optional):

  • matsoni or natural yogurt or smetana (sour cream)
  • garlic, couple of cloves

Procedure:

In a bowl mix the flours, add salt and oil. With your hands rub oil into the flour mixture, so that it’s distributed evenly. Gradually add water and mix until you have a very soft sticky dough. Cover the bowl and leave the dough to rest for 10 min.

Meanwhile prepare the filling. Finely chop the herbs. If you’re using nettle, first scald it with boiling water and then chop it (the nettle will thus lose its stinginess). Finely grate the cheese and mix in with the herbs. Add salt.

Flour the work surface and your hands. Pinch off a piece of dough that will fit in the palm of your hand. Roll it out into a flat round. Place some filling on one side of the dough leaving the edges free. Then fold the other side over the filling and seal the edges with a fork.

Place a dry skillet (preferably cast iron) over high heat (no greasing required!). If your pan is big enough you will be able to cook 2 qutabs at a time. Cook 1 minute, then turn the qutabs over and cook 1 minute more (my qutabs needed more time – I also baked only 2 and then placed the dough and the filling in the fridge for a later use).

Serve immediately with the matsoni and garlic sauce, dipping the qutabs into the sauce. The sauce can be made in advance so that it gets the most out of garlic flavour: press several cloves of garlic into matsoni, mix and place in the fridge. For the lack of matsoni you can use natural yogurt or smetana (sour cream).

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs

oh that melting cheese!

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs

Remarks: I would rather call the rye dough pretty bland (although it contained salt) but the filling was pretty salty (didn’t pay attention to the saltiness of the cheese). Also, next time I would roll the dough really thin cause it was quite chewy. You can also experiment with the sizes and the amount of filling – some of my qutabs were a bit too big 🙂 These are best eaten hot – so I suggest cutting the dough recipe by half. I ran out of cheese with that much of the dough and had to use mashed potatoes with the leftover cheese filling for the last qutabs.

Cheese and Herbs Qutabs

Result: Easy pies with melting cheese? Count me in! Perfect with some greens on the side and a lot of kefir (for the lack of traditional matsoni). Also no problem with keeping these pies in the fridge and reheating them later.

This post goes to Lunch / Dinner and the country-specific recipe collections (first Azerbaijani recipe!).

G.

bread · Italian recipe · sourdough

Addictive Grissini and Sourdough Bread Twists

Grissini (Thin Bread Sticks) from www.wildyeastblog.com

Hungry for some breadsticks? Here are two recipes which will give you a mountain – not kidding! – of truly addictive breadsticks: an easier chewy Italian recipe and a soft chewy but more time-consuming sourdough one. Be ready for both mountains to disappear very fast leaving nothing but some breadcrumbs…

Grissini (Thin Bread Sticks) from www.wildyeastblog.com

A year ago – Pear Clafoutis, Jelly Muffins and Scandinavian Twists

Two years ago – Colours of Summer

Three years ago – Short Post on Short Crusty Baguettes

Grissini or Thin Bread Sticks from Italy adapted from www.wildyeastblog.com will make a lot of crunchy salty breadsticks. I made twice recipe twice as it turned out – each time it was a 100% success! Visit the link above to get the entire recipe.

My changes: As for the topping, I sprinkled some of the breadsticks with pepper and some with the authentic herbes de Provence.

Grissini (Thin Bread Sticks) from www.wildyeastblog.com

Remarks: The procedure might seem a bit lengthy due to the extended rising time and several batches to bake but then it doesn’t require your immediate participation 🙂 Moreover these breadsticks are baking really fast, mine were ready in just about 20 minutes! When you are choosing the topping, make sure it is not “heavy” or just big – most of herbes de Provence just fell off although I mixed them into the olive oil. The grissini will be too thin for seeds either.

Result: Very addictive crunchy-crusty super-long breadsticks. The thinner you make them, the better, mmmm. Don’t be mislead by the photos – you will get really a mountain of them. It’s just that my camera battery died before I baked them all. And when I came back home some days ago, all that was left is pictured in the second photo…

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

The second breadstick recipe requires sourdough starter. I actually chose it cause my starter needed feeding while I had not much time to bake a proper sourdough bread. And here was this recipe which, although asking for a 6 hour rise, did not demand more than a usual breadstick recipe later on – and so I managed to bake it in one day. By the way, if you’re not ready to bake immediately, you can refrigerate the levain up to 24 hours which is handy.

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Sourdough Bread Twists adapted from www.karenskitchenstories.com will make super-long soft and chewy breadsticks with all those seeds actually NOT falling off 🙂 The recipe with all the instructions can be found at the link above.

My changes: I used my rye sourdough starter which I fed with all purpose flour (this added some color and an extra hint of rye flavour to the dough) and rye flour instead of pumpernickel flour. I added the required active dry yeast, although I am quite confident with the rising power of my sourdough alone. I was not sure about throwing in the entire 2 tablespoons of salt, so I used less and also skipped the extra salt for sprinkling. But after tasting the breadsticks I can say that they could have benefited from more salt. I didn’t brush the breadsticks once baked with oil either.

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Remarks: These breadsticks got a little bit tricky cause the combined power of sourdough and yeast made them all puffy. My breadsticks thus were really long (I had to bake them in two batches) and rather thick. They also were on the verge of falling from the baking sheet but I managed to stuff them into the oven 🙂 My first batch was all soft and chewy while the second one was crustier.

Sourdough Bread Twists from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Result: The combination of the tangy sourdough flavour and the chewiness of the seeds is something you don’t get from grissini. These are more on the soft side, though the thinner you make these, the crunchier they’ll get. Add salt according to your taste but be careful – these twists are also addictive and you can end up eating them all…

Adding these to my Yeast Bread, Sourdough and Country-specific recipe collections. You can also check out this extra-salty breadstick recipe.

G.

bread · Italian recipe · leftovers · sourdough

Italian Sourdough Bread with Potatoes and Herbs

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina from freebakery.blogspot.it

This is my first officially-spring post in 2015. And it’s about bread, you know… I’ve missed the blini-themed post this year as I didn’t make any Russian blini (crepes) this time. However one recipe I tried making for this year’s Maslenitsa period was pretty nice – the Swedish pancakes which were thin with just a little bit of flour, making them more like an omelette or a dessert. Ah, wait, there was another – quite challenging – recipe of wheat & rye pancakes which were really tasty with maple syrup.

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina from freebakery.blogspot.it

I like using potatoes in bread recipes but sometimes they become the cause for a very short life of the bread. Not that we eat it so fast that it doesn’t last long but mostly due to the very addition of the potatoes to the yeast dough. They seem to create this sticky moldy mess in the middle of the bread in several days. I hope that this recipe I’m sharing with you today is different – at least it doesn’t have that much moisture in it. But it is very-very soft and at the same time so potato-chewy! Slice and enjoy:

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina from freebakery.blogspot.it

A year ago – Sunflower Seed Rye Sourdough or We Need Sun Here

Two years ago – Thessaloniki and Sprouted Grains and Welcome Spring!

Three years ago – Mangoes and Rye to Welcome Spring

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina or Potato and Herbs Sourdough Bread adapted and translated from freebakery.blogspot.it will make a chewy moist sourdough bread. I could not find the original recipe copied some time ago, it’s not available online anymore. So here is its English version (see my remarks in italics).

Ingredients:

For the biga fermented for 10 hours at room temperature:

  • 90 g bread flour (farina tipo 1)  – I normally feed my sourdough with rye flour
  • 60 g water at 26 °C
  • 15 g rye sourdough culture

For the main dough:

  • 410 g bread flour  – I used a mixture of all-purpose + rye flour
  • 210 g water at 26 °C
  • 10 g rye sourdough culture
  • 8 g salt – I added less as my mashed potatoes already contained salt
  • 250 g mashed potatoes – you can use leftovers!
  • 7 g chives – I used various chopped herbs, left over from lunch

Procedure:

When the biga is ready (after fermenting at room temperature for 10 hours), dissolve it in water in which you have already dissolved the additional 10 g of sourdough culture. Add the mashed potatoes, then gradually add the sifted flour (I couldn’t resist making a mix with rye flour). Add the salt and make it absorbed by the mixture, then add the chives. Leave the dough to rest for 15 minutes, covered. Make folds at thirty minute intervals, 5-6 folds in total (I made 5 folds but not precisely each 30 minutes…) so that your dough is ‘mature’. Leave for 20 minutes after the last fold, covered. Preshape the dough and leave for 15 minutes, covered. Make a boulle and place it into a floured basket for 40-50 minutes.

Slash the top of the loaf and bake it at 250 °C with steam for 15 minutes, then at the same 250 °C but without steam for 25 min more (here my bread started burning which I could easily tell from the smell of burning flour) and then for the final 10 minutes at 200 °C without steam and with the oven door slightly cracked (I had to switch the oven off for the last period and leave the bread inside).

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina from freebakery.blogspot.it

Remarks: This is a recipe that helps using leftover mashed potatoes and probably even herbs (that’s what I did) and turns your plain bread into something more flavourful. I was using potatoes mashed with milk and butter which added some richness to the crumb. But you can use plain mashed potatoes for sure. Just add more herbs!

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina from freebakery.blogspot.it

A close up of the crumb:

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina from freebakery.blogspot.it

Result: The crumb is soft and crumbly, the crust is, well, in my case – burnt (rye flour that I used for sprinkling the basket also ‘helped’ here I guess). But the great thing about burning this bread a bit is that it tastes just like potatoes cooked in the ambers of a fire (or in the Russian oven)! I didn’t get much of the flavour from the herbs but for sure the addition of the mashed potatoes make this bread into a full-fledged meal.

Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina from freebakery.blogspot.it

Adding this to my collections of Sourdough bread, country-specific recipes and recipes using Leftovers (where you can find more ways to use your leftover mashed potatoes).

Went to De Phazz concert yesterday – what a voice & instrument show!

G.

bread · French recipe · sourdough

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls and Whole-Wheat Pain au Levain

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Ascending and descending stairs in museum-like libraries might make you hungry. A good ol’ slice (or slab? 🙂 of sourdough bread with honey will quench your hunger immediately! So don’t be shy, just make yourself a large slice and pour some honey over. A more Soviet variant will be bread with varenye, or confiture, a perfect substitution for any sweet treat. And it still works for me!

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Here are two recipes that I’ve tried recently to make my favourite type of bread (and food) – sourdough bread. If this works for you too – get your sourdough culture out and refresh it generously (I know you love it, just like I do!) – you will need quite a lot for these two recipes.

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls from sweetsoursavory.com

Let’s start with a recipe for sourdough buns – full of seeds and oats and very rustically-pretty on the outside too. I love to have something to chew on in my bread!

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls from sweetsoursavory.com

A year agoCaucasian Cheese Pie and Some Winter Reflections

Two years agoPetite Alsace and Petits Pains

Three years ago2 Breads with Poolish

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls adapted from sweetsoursavory.com will make pretty buns with seeds, seeds, seeds! Follow the link for the recipe, here are just my alterations:

I didn’t use any additional yeast, relying 100% on my rye sourdough culture. As for the other ingredients, I added 4 cereal mix for porridge (oats + barley + rye + wheat flakes) + some extra rolled oats to make up for 1 cup. I couldn’t resist adding some rye flour (of course), so my buns turned out darker (of course). But that’s how I like my bread! I didn’t roll my buns in anything, just used plain flour.

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls from sweetsoursavory.com

This bun got such a peculiar shape cause, well, I shaped it this way! : )

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls from sweetsoursavory.com

Remarks: All the while these buns require 12 to 20 hour rest in the fridge, they bake really fast, just about 15-20 minutes in the oven and they are done! And they also ‘cracked’ nicely, making you want to tear them open at once! : ) Like this:

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls from sweetsoursavory.com

Result: A great recipe for rustic-looking sourdough buns. If you want something like those crusty buns from a French bakery (in France, s’il vous plaît!) that make that crunch-crunch sound when you grab the paper bag… – you got them!

Breakfast Sourdough Rolls from sweetsoursavory.com

Next recipe – to keep in line with the French theme – is exactly a French bread recipe, made more Russian with my imminent addition of rye flour. Again, if you compare my result with the photos on the original website, you’ll see how far my rye addi(c)tion sometimes take me : )

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

69% Hydration Pain au Levain adapted from www.karenskitchenstories.com will make dense, moist bread with strong whole wheat flavor. Follow the link to get the entire recipe. My changes:

Used my rye sourdough culture and fed it with rye flour (I know what my baby likes most! :). I didn’t use less levain, so secreased the amount of water by 45 g. What I did add as usual was more whole wheat flour + some wheat bran + rye flour (haha). I used less salt (when I bake bread for myself only, I normally skip salt at all).

As for the procedure, it requires time for sure, but I started in the morning, left the levain for the required minimum of 8 hours (with the rye flour the result is quicker) and then baked the bread in the evening. Which gave me cooled down, almost fresh bread in the morning!

My oven here is small, so I did not use any Dutch oven-substitution (which is usually a large metal bowl turned upside down to cover the bread loaf), I just baked two loaves side by side with some steam.

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

After some hesitation (or should I say – caprice) the St Petersburg sun made its appearance and turned the bluish photos into a more pleasing and realistic representations. But of course there’s nothing like actually EATING this bread!

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

By the way, our lazy and consequently rare St Petersburg sun appears in winter ONLY when it is VERY cold. I’m serious! The clouds bring warmer weather but they also veil all the sun rays from us, already ‘pail as death’ as we say in Russia. On the contrary, cold days most often mean sun. It doesn’t heat but it makes life better.

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Remarks: Although I don’t have a slightest idea whether my bread was 69% hydration or not, I surely did like it from the very start. Actually, I think that my bread is less moist and has less air pockets with all my additions.

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Result: I can assure you that this bread IS tasty. The two loaves are not here to stay very long… I was craving for something with whole-wheat dominant in it. Just to make change from all-rye bread : ) And here I found it! The bread will make suuuuch nice slices (=slabs in the widest part of the round loaf). Tried it with honey, mmmmm!

69% HYDRATION PAIN AU LEVAIN from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Coming up – sweet recipes with the most obvious ingredient, guess which one!

Adding these recipes to my ever-growing  sourdough bread collection.

G.

bread · sourdough · St Petersburg

Winter Fairy Tale and Semolina Bread

winter fairy tale

Winter day is short but sometimes very fairy-tale-like beautiful. St Petersburg is never very generous as for the sun but when it appears, life seems magical =) Welcome into the new year!

winter fairy tale

And when the sun is absent, at least the snowy days are not missing a certain bluish-white beauty of its own. It’s just that the snow rarely stays with us for long, our humid climate and the winds always bring change in weather.

winter fairy tale

In this first post of 2015 I would like to share with you this super-crusty sourdough bread recipe, bread being my one and only favourite food 🙂

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

Here’s this bread with the rising winter sun in the morning:

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

A year agoChocolate, Cocoa, Coffee and Cakes

Two years agoJoin the Soviet New Year Table

Three years agoSourdough Breads

Semolina Bread adapted from www.hestiaskitchen.com will make white sourdough bread, very dense in the crumb, truly crusty and, well, tasty! Follow the link to get the entire recipe.

My changes: I used my rye sourdough culture and fed it with rye flour. However, my bread was only slightly less white than it would be if using wheat flour sourdough. I chose to make only one loaf and it turned out big and heavy. However there was no problem baking it.

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

Remarks: The recipe is really easy, it gives you time between the ‘steps’ and doesn’t require too many steps. The only thing is that you need to get quite a lot of sourdough for this recipe. And be careful with salt! My bread was a bit too salty but with cheese and some veggie the sandwiches were just fine.

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

The crumb:

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

The crumb and the crust:

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

Oh that crust!

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

Result: If you are dreaming of a crusty bread for tasty morning sandwiches, this is the one! The semolina flour makes each slice dense, thick and nutritious even if you make them thin 🙂 The end (or butt?) slices are the most delicious!

Semolina Bread from www.hestiaskitchen.com

Adding this to my collection of Sourdough bread recipes. Yesterday I baked two baguette-like loaves without any recipe, also using semolina flour + some oat bran to keep the whiteness of the bread all the while adding something healthy. But this time the bread was with yeast. Result – dense crumb and crusty top!

winter fairy tale

Misty days with high humidity and all-weather-all-seasons-proof fishermen on the frozen river – the usual picture. I haven’t dared crossing the river on the ice yet!

G.