architecture · on USSR / Russia · travel

Yaroslavl and Rostov Veliky

Rostov

After seeing three European capitals in January, I’ve now switched back to the explorations within my own country, so i will interrupt my account of the Mitteleuropa trip to share my most recent impressions of two popular Russia’s Golden Ring destinations, the old cities of Yaroslavl and Rostov Veliky (not to be confused with Rostov-on-Don in the South of Russia).

Yaroslavl

I saw both cities about 17 years ago and in summer but I can remember very little – and mostly thanks to the photos that back then we would print out and look at not just once. So this time it was just as if I went there for the first time anyway. I chose the bigger Yaroslavl as my base from which I travelled to the smaller Rostov.

Yaroslavl

And as always (well, actually only since I’ve started travelling on my own) I’ve enjoyed the train part of the journey. I travelled by night both there and back but I did not leave the train too early in the morning to miss that feeling of having a pretty lazy start of the day while knowing that you will have pretty busy rest of the day afterwards. So I arrived in Yaroslavl towards midday and had just several hours of light in front of me. Well, the day was not sunny at all which probably also influenced my perception of the city.

Yaroslavl

I started off from my hostel which was super conveniently located just next to the railway station and when I got to the center of the city, I noticed a flow of people heading towards the square in front of the cathedral – where they were celebrating the Russian Shrovetide, Maslenitsa.

Yaroslavl

I ignored the celebrations and chose to go see the Volga river instead – last time I saw it in Samara and had a swim there too. In the picture below you can see ice and snow-covered Kotorosl river and the ice-free Volga to the left. They come together at this point which is called Strelka (Arrow). This pavilion is one of the symbols of the city and one of the musts for all tourist groups.

Yaroslavl

After realizing that it should be less windy and hence warmer the farther you get from Volga I went to the Yaroslavl Kremlin – or rather Spaso-Preobrazhensky Monastery which was so fortified back in the old days it still looks like a fortress (and is mistakenly referred to as kremlin).

Yaroslavl

Unfortunately, the place is pretty run-down and doesn’t really impress you even though it seems to have all the necessary ingredients such as whitewashed walls, strong gates and a belltower.

Yaroslavl

Love these outside wooden staircases – they seem to be hanging on air and to be popping up in all possible places!

Yaroslavl

I went inside one of these buildings to see the exposition dedicated to the history of the region. One of the objects on display that keep amusing me since I went to a similar museum in Ryazan is kopoushka – a funny named thing used to pick old Russians’ ears 🙂 No photo of this thingy here but you can follow the link to see its many incarnations.

Yaroslavl

Sure enough they tell you about the main symbol of the city in that museum, the bear. It occupies the central place in one of the legends surrounding the foundation of Yaroslavl: they say the original dwellers of these parts used to worship bears and even sent a really ferocious one after prince Yaroslav the Wise, so he killed the bear and took over the power and built the city (which according to one of the versions took its name after Yaroslav). One of the numerous bear symbols in the city is right there on top of the tower:

Yaroslavl

There was a fun part in there for me too: a local producers’ market because that was the Maslenitsa weekend and the first and foremost thing everybody is up to during Shrovetide in Russia – is food. So out I went with a jar of cherry-rum confiture and some meat for my Dad. I also found some super flavourful honey from the Kuban’ region and tasty ryazhenka (baked milk) on my way back to the hostel. Also bought this black bread called Monastyrsky (it had no label on its package so I can only assume that it was made with sourdough and rye malt):

Monastyrsky Bread

Next morning I went to Rostov the Great (Rostov Veliky), within an hour bus ride from Yaroslavl. Just like in the Vladimir / Suzdal couple, Rostov used to be much bigger and much more important than Yaroslavl but then lost all the power. It now resembles a real village with lots of tourists and not many locals around. On the way from the bus / railway station to the center I spotted this dying wooden heritage:

Rostov

When you reach the ‘Kremlin’ (yet again, this is not technically a kremlin, it was the residence of the Metropolitan of Rostov), you do get impressed at its solidness especially if you know that it was not built to defend the city!

Rostov

Its fortified walls are particularly popular among Russian tourists for it being a movie set for the 1973 Soviet classics Ivan Vasilievich Changes His Profession (based on Bulgakov’s play).

Rostov

The city stars in several other movies as well. Seems like it managed to preserve this allure of a provincial town which other cities around Moscow might have lost due to heavy – mostly Brezhnev’s era – construction and reconstruction.

Rostov

An ex-church, apparently, and some rusty but still functioning mail boxes:

Rostov

I really enjoyed walking around the whitewashed walls and up to the lake Nero (yes, the name has obvious Greek roots). The lake was also white – all covered with ice and snow. And there was also sun blinding you with its unexpected enthusiasm as well as such strong wind you could hear it howling although there was nothing but plain surface of a frozen lake in front of you.

Rostov

The amazing Lake Nero and super happy French tourists hopping around:

Rostov

And you can walk on water and enjoy the cityscape…

Rostov

The sun obviously helped enjoy it even more, bringing out the colors:

Rostov

…and then you can climb up the rampant and watch children sliding down the slopes:

Rostov

I guess Rostov in winter is the place to take tourists to see something truly Russian. Besides, the Rostov ‘Kremlin’ looks much better than the one in Yaroslavl. However, there was a fair share of decadence inside too, so I had my moments of architectural pleasure when I entered its walls.

Rostov

And why not combine architectural pleasure with some gastronomic pleasure as well? Here’s how:

Rostov

Home-baked bulochka with apples and cranberries, mmmm, the dough was so light and sweet – just like a pillow! The lady making and selling them has taken the most advantageous spot there is in Rostov – right in front of the entrance to the museum, can’t miss that!

Rostov

And meanwhile inside the Rostov ‘kremlin’ the spring has arrived:

Rostov

…making navigating around a bit complicated. In some places you just had to run quick under a shower of melting snow and over a big puddle.

Rostov

Patterns:

Rostov

More details:

Rostov

Fortification walls which were never supposed to serve as fortification:

Rostov

And here’s the Metropolitan’s Garden – must look amazing in spring / early summer with all the apple trees blossoming:

Rostov

More details:

Rostov

This is actually the entrance to the history museum (a rather disappointingly small one compared to Yaroslavl). Can you imagine that this very bit of a Byzantine jug should survive and not some other of its pieces?

Rostov

A rather unusually decorated church with a matching pine branch:

Rostov

Check out that door!

Rostov

This one is serious too:

Rostov

A rather run-down cathedral:

Rostov

The gates to the kremlin-residence:

Rostov

More details:

Rostov

Meanwhile outside of the kremlin walls: decadence, anyone?

Rostov

There was a bunch of wooden Art-Nouveau houses along Okruzhnaya street which runs round the center of Rostov right to / from the lake. This one resembles some kind of a green bug, quite in the fashion of Art-Nouveau:

Rostov

But the obvious winner was this house with a mad-mad-mad balcony windows:

Rostov

And loads of decadence around – this house was abandoned both by people and by wasps (see their nest in the top left hand corner):

Rostov

There was also an ex-church with its belltower turned into… a (fire) watchtower! I went up to the lake to have a glimpse of its magic before I headed off to the bus station. On my way from the lake the decadence was interrupted by some nicely preserved specimens of traditional Russian window frame decorations:

Rostov

As you might have already guessed, I enjoyed Rostov Veliky more – even though it is really small and packed with tourists in its most popular spots. I would love to come back to Rostov in spring or summer – the lake Nero should be gorgeous! And after all I haven’t heard all the legends surrounding it and haven’t been to all the monasteries on its shores to get the best views.

This post goes to the On Russia and Travel series.

G.

architecture · no recipe · travel

Easy-Going Bratislava and Devin Hrad

Bratislava

This new year break was the second one in my life when I was away from home. I went to the yet undiscovered Mitteleuropa, visiting three capitals in one go: Slovakia’s Bratislava, Austria’s Vienna and Czech Republic’s Prague.

Bratislava

Bratislava welcomed me with seizing cold and wind. I left St Petersburg in sports shoes so you can imagine I was quite unprepared for long strolls. Even my camera was unprepared – it got all cold and its battery died on the first day before I could take the pictures of the misty snowy Bratislava.

Bratislava

Wandering in the relatively small old town of Bratislava won’t allow you to get lost for sure but it will provide you with quite a number of small details that I appreciate much more than anything else.

Bratislava

Adorable curves and street lamps all over the old town of Bratislava:

Bratislava

Right in the center of the old town. Wonderfully decadent.

Bratislava

But the most decadent street is Kapitulska which leads up to St Martin’s Cathedral. Reminded me of Thessaloniki’s Ano Poli.

Bratislava

This street is also right next to the city wall. Just one street but almost each house is mouthwatering for such decadence freaks like me.

Bratislava

A missing house which left its trace on the surviving neighbor’s wall:

Bratislava

I wonder how many more years these houses will last. The on eat the end of the lane doesn’t seem to be doing particularly good anymore.

Bratislava

13th century St Martin’s Cathedral. A place to warm up your frozen limbs before continuing your explorations:

Bratislava

Old pharmacy with a small opening for giving out prescription drugs?

Bratislava

The most famous bridge in Bratislava aka Most SNP and one of the city’s symbols since the 1970s. Also features a restaurant on top of the UFO-like tower. In that kind of weather it just lacked some lights to compliment the picture.

Bratislava

The remains of the city wall and the houses crawling up the hill crowned by the Bratislava Castle:

Bratislava

Frozen garden inside the reconstructed Bratislava Castle. This cloth is used for shielding the trees.

Bratislava

A frozen alley close to the National Theater. Looking all like Paris or Vienna (as I discovered later on).

Bratislava

Misty Danube after I’ve recharged my camera and went for a walk to the river. Children were playing hockey on the ice. Well, it’s not technically Danube, this is an intermediary stream Karloveske Rameno that I’ve crossed over to reach the real Danube. There’s also a Water Museum there.

Bratislava

I went up to see the city from the Bratislava Castle hill several times. The castle itself did not impress me much- it has been heavily renovated (or rather recreated) as it fell in disrepair and remained in ruins until 1950s. Although every magnet or postcard features the Castle as the most recognizable symbol of the city, I preferred the view from the Castle. They say you can see Hungary on a fine clear day from up there:

Bratislava

On one of the days I went to yet another castle, Devin Hrad or Devin Castle, one of the popular attractions very close to the place where my dear friend lives. It is situated at the confluence of Danube and Moravia rivers, a very fine spot!

Devin Hrad

It’s one of the most ancient castles in Slovakia, And as is common with (remains of) the castles, the view from the top is worth all the climbing and entrance fees 🙂

Devin Hrad

It was a windy day with some glimpses of sun so I could enjoy the scenery and was almost blown away when I got to the top of the hill. Unfortunately, the very top part of the castle was closed (it’s winter after all) so I could only wander round the lower towers.

Devin Hrad

That small tower is called the Maiden tower and immediately attracts your attention (and there’s of course a number of legends built around it). Love the sheer bulk of the castle, the massiveness and the roughness of the stone against the riverside background:

Devin Hrad

Remains of a 9th century church with the only thing still intact – the view over Danube. After all, the name of the castle, Devin, actually derives from the Slavic word for seeing, although other interpretations include such meanings as ‘the place of evil spirits’ or ‘castle of the girl’ among others.

Devin Hrad

On my last day in Bratislava we made a walk in the city center – and there was sun, finally. It looked even prettier with the sun, especially through the stained glass window – just like a fairy tale town!

Bratislava

These pictures were taken from inside the Town Hall which is now a museum:

Bratislava

You don’t need a monocle with these windows 🙂

Bratislava

All in all I really liked the country. I didn’t see much but I could grasp the easy-going spirit of the place (and I enjoyed the language too!). There’s something to the Eastern Europe that makes it closer to my heart. It’s not that fixed as the Western Europe and thus less predictable.

Bratislava

And yes, you can purchase locally produced sheep and cow-milk cheese and yogurt from a vending machine at the public transport stops. None of your chocolate bars or fizzy drinks please! 🙂 We’ve tried this cheese, called Mini Parenicky, which reminded me of suluguni:

Bratislava

Here pictured with spaetzle, cottage cheese and some salad. It was a very nice lunch we had at my friend’s place before I grabbed my rucksack and set off for my long way back home.

The following posts will be about Vienna and Prague.

This post goes to the Travel collection.

G.

 

architecture · no recipe · on USSR / Russia · travel

Ryazan and a Bit of Moscow

Ryazan

On the first weekend of December I continued my adventures in Russia visiting Ryazan, and old city some 180 km away from Moscow. I took a train from St Petersburg which arrives pretty early in the morning. After getting some more sleep and a substantial breakfast at the hostel I went out to see the sights. It was snowing and there was unfortunately no sun at all. My first stop was at this church (Borisoglebsky Cathedral) which has a street running underneath it:

Ryazan

It was super slippery walking there but here it is from the other side:

Ryazan

Walking a bit forward to the Ryazan Kremlin I found this wooden house with a menacing note that informs its tenants of an imminent resettlement this summer… I hope they will somehow keep the building (just two steps away from it is an almost entirely burnt down wooden mansion ‘under reconstruction’).

Ryazan

The door was open:

Ryazan

I can imagine it’s not very easy living in such place but it’s so elaborate and just beats flat all the later built stuff around… Note the external thermometer outside of the window – don’t believe the weather forecast, trust your own sight:

Ryazan

Finally I got to the Kremlin where the tourist life was about to begin. It was Saturday after all:

Ryazan

It’s a pity there’s no observation point on any of the bell towers in the city (or did I miss anything?) cause it would be great to see the landscape – and the cityscape – from above. The rives Trubezh and Lybed, the tributaries of the larger Oka river, create a curious and beautifully carved landscape with meadows and hills.

Ryazan
Somewhere beyond the city lies the territory described by the Russian writer Konstantin Paustovsky whose short stories we all read as children in Russia. The old-school wooden building in blue is the river pier from where you can travel to the Oka river:

Ryazan
The Kremlin is traditionally situated on the top of the hill surrounded by the river streams. This is a part (ruined) of the Shelter for People (as opposed to the Shelter for Nobles situated nearby) and the Church of the Holy Ghost with a non-common two-pinnacle style.

Ryazan

I really liked this People’s Shelter building which curves a bit in the center:

Ryazan

The Ryazan Kremlin was founded in 1095 (which is also considered to be the foundation year of the city itself) and it continued developing mostly throughout the 13-18th centuries. Even though its walls are made in brick is preserves the traditional white-washed wall style:

Ryazan

I really like all those architectural details:

Ryazan

Enhanced with the snow:

Ryazan

These two buildings house the local History Museum where I spent almost third of the day, not only escaping from the cold but also actually learning something about the region – and about my country too.

Ryazan

There was this exposition on a woman who collected local crafts in the beginning of the 20th century. Looking at all those intricate embroidery, lace and skillfully woven cloth made me sigh and conclude that we’ve lost such a huge part of our heritage. We don’t know it, we ignore the meaning of all those colours and symbols and patterns.We don’t even know the parts of the traditional Russian costume.

Ryazan

There is also these reconstructed halls which look pretty touristy although I appreciate their attempt at recreating something super-(kitchy)-Russian:

Ryazan

After the museum I went on exploring the Kremlin (and the city).

Ryazan

The windy and mostly white-washed wall territory of the Ryazan Kremlin has a later Assumption Cathedral with this amazing mosque-like door which was unfortunately closed as it can only be visited during the warm(er) months. This is the main church in the city.

Ryazan

Here it is seen from the mound together with the bell tower and the wall inside which there is a… toilet 🙂

Ryazan

The mound looks really cool:

Ryazan

There’s a short street called Rabochaya (Working) running almost back-to-back with the mound. It has several obviously non-inhabited wooden houses like this one, built somewhere in the beginning of the 20th century I suppose:

Ryazan

This is another cathedral which is decorated with the colourful tiles looking particularly good against the (decadently non-) white walls:

Ryazan
Looking at the Kremlin from the Soborny (Cathedral) park and the Church of Spas-na-Yaru:

Ryazan

With all the churches and cathedrals, Ryazan has two Bezbozhnaya streets – Atheist or literally God-less Streets. TWO. Pervaya (First) Bezbozhnaya and Vtoraya (Second) Bezbozhnaya. They probably have other problems to solve than to rename those two streets, like the center of the city in a somewhat bad state:

Ryazan

I wondered off the Kremlin into the pedestrian Pochtovaya (Post) Street visiting of course the local post office in the search of ANY postcards that won’t be sold in packs. The green building behind the statue (to some famous nobleman) used to be the city’s main bank. Ryazan has a number of imperial buildings dating back to as early as the Peter the Great’s times.

Ryazan

As I spent quite a bit of time in the museums I did not see some of the minor musts of the city. What I can tell you is that the city is a bit of a maze and I discovered most of the sights by actually getting lost while trying to find some other sight. I really liked the presence of several rivers in the city and the way Ryazan builds up on their banks. The only drawback was that I couldn’t find that much of local food there: when I asked about anything local, a puzzled shop-assistant told me they have local kotlety (meat patties) 🙂   So I bought this black bread from the Tula region (another old city around Moscow, famous for its pryanik, samovar and weapons) instead:

Moscow

This is a sourdough rye bread made with fermented rye malt, molasses, kvass wort concentrate (used to make the traditional beverage kvass) and such (a variety of) spices as allspice, black pepper, cardamom, coriander, cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg. The bread is called Starorussky Nasuschny (Old-Russian Daily or Vital) and it has three bogatyr (aka old-Russian supermen) pictured on its package. The bread was soft and really flavourful! To accompany it I bought some – finally – local  cheese:

Moscow

The cheese – called Myagky Ryazansky (Soft from Ryazan) was somewhat close to Adygea cheese but more dense. The cheese is made from cow’s milk and salt (not too salty). I used it for a pie with fresh coriander and tvorog from the same dairy farm.

So my verdict on Ryazan: it’s big and thus less cozily attractive as Vladimir (or Suzdal). It has interesting stuff in its museums and a rather concentrated old center. Not many local crafts / food detected though. Should be a very nice place to walk in summer with the rivers, hills, an island and the meadows.

Moscow

Later that day I took a fast double-decker train that circulates between Moscow and Voronezh (the region I visited last November) and in just two hours I was in Moscow. The weather was expected to be quite harsh but we ventured out on a (substantial) walking tour in the district of Khamovniky where the craftsmen would make and sell their linen fabric (the now – light – swear word ‘kham‘ originally meant linen fabric) many many years ago. I have never been to this part of the district which is situated closer to the end of the bend that the Moscow river creates (here it is on the map). Our first stop was at the Novodevichy Convent which we all know about from the school history lessons and for the famous people buried there and which is planted right there in the middle of the huge megalopolis. The Convent, one of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Moscow, has survived almost intact from the 16-17th centuries and is now sort of an open-air museum of Moscow baroque architecture. It is called Novodevichy for a reason (oe a number of reasons): it being new in comparison with the other – older – monasteries and a convent (devitsa = girl) also used for exiling unwanted tsar’s wives and other royal females, like Peter the Great’s grandmother.  

Moscow

While wandering in the district we also had a chance to admire this late 17th century church of St Nicolas in Khamovniki which after an apparently recent renovation looks pretty cake-like. They say Leo Tolstoy used to frequent this church as he lived just several meters away:

Moscow

And it was exactly his house that we also visited that day – located in the same formerly Dolgokhamovnichesky (Long / Big Khamovnichesky) Lane, now Leo Tolstoy Street. Tolstoy lived here in 1882-1901 and created many of his works like The Kreutzer Sonata and Resurrection.

Moscow

The wooden house appears quite small from the outside but has actually quite a number of rooms as it got rebuilt and upgraded several times since its construction in the early 19th century. They say most of the things (I mean exhibits) are Tolstoy’s original belongings. Thanks to his fame and the general love and respect from the official Soviet side, we can now see not a reconstructed but indeed preserved interiors.

Moscow

Some of the rooms look super modest (like the tiny bedrooms with tiny beds and almost nothing else) whereas others look pretty kitchy and crowded with things. Even if you’re not that into Tolstoy’s writings, I would recommend visiting his museum for the sake of the ambience, as a peek into the life of Moscow intelligentsia in the late 19th century. The territory is surrounded with a fence, there’s a garden and some auxiliary constructions (should be nice in summer – as all things are!). It’s also such a quiet place in the middle of the high-rise high-tech Moscow that you can hardly believe it was not erased to the ground. It reminded me of the recently visited Surikov’s museum in Krasnoyarsk – these places just take you away from the real life for a moment.

Moscow

Tried to get some food pictured for my future posts – but in vain. There was a weekend of sunny days but… nothing new or unusual to share with you.

Adding this post to the Travel collection.

G.

architecture · no recipe · on USSR / Russia · travel

Winter Dreams of Vladimir and Suzdal

Suzdal - Vladimir

I recently ventured out on a short escape from the city life to two of the Russia’s so-called Golden Ring of historical cities, Vladimir and Suzdal. They are situated close to Moscow and there’s a direct train that will take you there overnight from St Petersburg. Both cities are among the oldest in Russia classified as UNESCO World Heritage Sites and both have a long story to tell.

Suzdal - Vladimir

I arrived in Vladimir so early in the morning that managed to gain several hours of sleep at a hostel before going out to explore the sights.  First, I took a bus to Suzdal, which long long ago used to be even larger and more important than Vladimir.

Suzdal - Vladimir

A local bus took me to Suzdal pretty fast and when I got there I was among the very few tourists (more of them arrived later) who were not scared by the wind, snow and general gloomish atmosphere.

Suzdal - Vladimir

However, it actually added to the overall impression of a tiny town resembling an open-air museum more than anything else.

Suzdal - Vladimir

With the whitewashed walls and the white snow (which do not seem that white when you come close to them) and the white sky, Suzdal in winter is a perfect place for listening carefully to its secrets, not disturbed by the hoards of tourists.

Suzdal - Vladimir

I took multiple pictures from all the angles although I was constantly worried that my camera’s battery would freeze. It’s obvious that in summer you are supposed to spend much more time near each point of interest just because it’s warmer but at the same time you probably will not as you will be facing loads of tourists trying to do the same.

Suzdal - Vladimir

Can you feel the fragility and the sophistication of Suzdal in winter?

Suzdal - Vladimir

Its old walls told me stories of the past: after all the town counts almost 1000 years of written history!

Suzdal - Vladimir

It was huge before Moscow became prominent and it had so many churches as no other Russian town could boast of.

Suzdal - Vladimir

But now the only thing that keeps it alive is the tourism: the smallest of all the Golden Ring cities (the concept was introduced in the Soviet era) has the greatest amount of tourists.

Suzdal - Vladimir

The things that you might want to visit in Suzdal are all situated within a walking distance, starting from the Trading Arcades (see pictures 5, 6, 8) and the nearby Kremlin (see the photo above and 5 photos down), which is the oldest part of the town (10th century),..

Suzdal - Vladimir

…with this 13th century church that has a very attractive door:

Suzdal - Vladimir

and the 16-18th century halls and Archbishop’s chambers with whitewashed walls:

Suzdal - Vladimir

It was 10 am when I got to the Kremlin – so deserted:

Suzdal - Vladimir

But the restaurant’s door was half-open:

Suzdal - Vladimir

Just noticed the somewhat conflicting pavement – too new to match with the whitewashed walls.

Suzdal - Vladimir

Looking at the picture above taken from the wooden Church of St. Nicholas makes me travel back to that moment.

Suzdal - Vladimir

Cold.

Suzdal - Vladimir

Snowy.

Suzdal - Vladimir

While the town was patiently waiting for the buses to come in with the tourists, I went to the open-air museum which gathers log-houses and wooden churches of the 18-19th centuries exemplifying the traditional Russian architecture.

Suzdal - Vladimir

For me, the most interesting part is what you can see inside of the log houses.

Suzdal - Vladimir

I know that all this is done for the tourists but…

Suzdal - Vladimir

…it’s so cozy inside! and warm 🙂

Suzdal - Vladimir

Inside almost each house you’re welcomed by a lady or two dressed in traditional clothes who is ready to tell you about the old habits, explain to you the use of all those objects and… discuss politics and smartphone applications 🙂

Suzdal - Vladimir

There are also two windmills, several storehouses and other constructions you would find in a village. There is also a stone house of a well-off merchant.

Suzdal - Vladimir

Leaving the cozy museum of the wooden architecture, I went back to the Kremlin:

Suzdal - Vladimir

…and then proceeded on till I got to the Monastery of Saint Euthymius which I decided to leave for future since I wanted to see Vladimir in the daylight too. On my way I spotted numerous facades, this one, for example, is in the Old (Staraya) Street :

Suzdal - Vladimir

this one is very festive:

Suzdal - Vladimir

and this one looks beautiful:

Suzdal - Vladimir

and this one looks fancy too:

Suzdal - Vladimir

I liked this surviving house dating back to the 17th century with this small ‘baby’ attachment, to my mind – for storing stuff.

Suzdal - Vladimir

I took my old-school bus back to Vladimir and walked there quite a bit along the main street, occasionally turning into the adjacent streets when something caught my eye. Like this tile:

Suzdal - Vladimir

Or this Art-Nouveau school (now university):

Suzdal - Vladimir

It’s interesting that from our first visit to Vladimir about 16 years ago I can hardly remember anything. Even this hallmark of the city, the Golden Gate, somehow did not get engraved into my memory:

Suzdal - Vladimir

It’s lower part is authentic (12th century) while the upper part was added / renovated in the 18th century. The center of Vladimir is pretty low-rise to say the least:

Suzdal - Vladimir

And here’s how it looks from the top of the ex-water tower which is now a museum dedicated to the old Vladimir: how the town looked like before and what the life there was like.

Suzdal - Vladimir

The top floor provides you with a view over the town with its small houses, churches and hills.

Suzdal - Vladimir

A street close to the museum with the road post:

Suzdal - Vladimir

Further along that street:

Suzdal - Vladimir

Another view over the city:

Suzdal - Vladimir

The dusk was already there when I got to the Assumption (Uspensky) Cathedral:

Suzdal - Vladimir

But it looked even more sophisticated and a bit eerie in this bluish light:

Suzdal - Vladimir

The horizon got lost in the snow:

Suzdal - Vladimir

When I got to the St Demetrius Cathedral (12th century), the daylight was gone:

Suzdal - Vladimir

The town turned its lights on and I walked here and there popping into local shops and ended up buying pryanik with cherries (they say Vladimir used to be famous for its cherry orchards) and wild apricot and lemon jam from Dagestan 🙂 I also bought this bread called Mstyora bread:

Mstera Bread

It’s a light rye bread made with rye malt and coriander made according to the recipe from Mstyora in the Vladimir region. Mstyora is actually better known for its miniature art. They make miniatures with a black background similar to the more popular Palekh art which I used to dream of when I was a child – I begged my Mom to buy me a tiny lacquered box to keep my precious objects there.

On the first photo: Stained-glass window at the Vladimir bus station.

This post goes to the Travel series.

G.

no recipe · on USSR / Russia · travel

A Getaway to Veliky Novgorod

Novgorod

Veliky Novgorod, or Novgorod the Great, welcomed us with a cold and gloomy weather but the next day was it was sunny and even warm. A run across the bridge over lake Ilmen and along the tourist-less Kremlin walls was just what I needed!

Novgorod

You somehow miss such moments in St Petersburg – because it is rarely people-free, there are no REALLY old places and the overall feeling is that of a European city rather than one in Russia. And that’s why this getaway to Veliky Novgorod was like a breath of very fresh air to me. Couldn’t get back to senses for about a week afterwards!

Novgorod

You can see the Kremlin to the left of the photo above – with its red-brick walls and the bell towers. The Kremlin has been upgraded and rebuilt over the centuries but as it was not destroyed during the Tatar-Mongol yoke, it somehow represents that old Russia which most of the cities just lost.

Novgorod

This white wall was reconstructed there where the merchants would sell their goods, on the Merchants’ Side, opposite the Kremlin. The Ilmen lake and the Volkhov river provided the water way needed for the development of the trade.

Novgorod

Veliky Novgorod was rich and independent until Moscow took over. It traded with the Europe and the East. And it was a republic too!

Novgorod

The next day after we arrived I took a picture of the same place in much better weather circumstances. This bell tower is right in the middle of the Novgorod’s Kremlin:

Novgorod

Veliky Novgorod is the land of churches. Of all sizes and centuries. This tiny church is on the Kremlin’s territory too:

Novgorod

And I think I like it more than one of the oldest stone churches in Russia, St Sophia (11th century):

Novgorod

This one (on Ilyina Street, away from the Kremlin) is just like a rocket in a mist 🙂 Although that was not exactly a mist but the smoke coming from some spring-cleaning in the nearby courtyard. We tried to bang on the door but no one would open, so we called the number indicated on the door and got inside to see some Theophanes the Greek‘s frescoes.

Novgorod

Opposite this church is this monastery. With wonderful architectural decorations. You can tell these were HAND-made. Unique!

Novgorod

And even random architectural forms in the courtyard of our hostel (which occupies a quite old building too) do remind you of a church:

Novgorod

Well, not to mention that some citizens of Novgorod the Great actually LIVE inside a church! This one is St Ilya on Slavna, transformed into a residential building in the wild atheist times:

Novgorod

Last time we were there in 2013 and there were cats looking out of the window. This time we were observed by a local instead. The building is just mind-boggling.

Novgorod

Nice combination of the rusty brick color with the grass.

Novgorod

Another example of architecture blending in with the nature (and vice versa):

Novgorod

Some Moscow-style architecture for a change, with a pink-colored church in the background:

Novgorod

Birds enjoying the spring sun:

Novgorod

Absolutely love those shapes, patterns and volumes:

Novgorod

Another rocket-like church, with a later addition visible to the left:

Novgorod

This is a church in Perynsky Hermitage. Similar windows with small circles and the inevitable signs of the civilization 🙂

Novgorod

The Perynsky Hermitage stands on the Ilmen lake, where we spent some time enjoying the pine forest and the first signs of the spring:

Novgorod

And this is a different type of Russian churches, but the one which persisted the most. This is Vitoslavlitsy, an open air museum with all those log houses and churches collected all over the region to make an entire village.

Novgorod

It might be quite touristy (especially during summer and various festivities) but I like it there.

Novgorod

You can enter almost all the residential buildings and see what’s inside.

Novgorod

The interior reconstructs mostly later centuries but still you can get a feeling:

Novgorod

This long stick is a proto-lamp:

Novgorod

The Russian stove which was the first thing to be constructed when a house was being built, the place for baking, cooking…

Novgorod

… sleeping (on top), washing (inside!), giving birth etc.

Novgorod

Nice:

Novgorod

The so called “red corner” – for the icon, the beautiful hand-woven and embroidered towel and a lamp. During the Soviet times this expression got a different meaning – the place for Soviet propaganda power in a building.

Novgorod

We didn’t have much time there but I could have stayed longer.

Novgorod

Very cozy. Although a traditional Russian isba (the word comes from istopit, to heat) would be heated po-chernomu, without a pipe letting the smoke outside of the building (hence the dark walls) – all this combined with small and low windows.

Novgorod

And the windows from the outside:

Novgorod

And some more churches before we leave Veliky Novgorod:

 

Novgorod

As you can see, I’m much more interested in their architectural forms than in what they represent:

Novgorod

For me they represent the history, the tradition and the people. And the connection to all of it through the centuries.

Novgorod

More of the rusty colors. Looking good in the sun. After just a couple of centuries 🙂

Novgorod

Those shapes!

Novgorod

The lace-like decoration of this church reminds me of a traditional hand-woven towel.

Novgorod

So white and decadent.

Novgorod

Hope I could give you an idea of a – well – real Russian city.

Novgorod

The weekend was great. Miss travelling and learning about my country!

Adding this post to the On Russia series.

G.

no recipe · on USSR / Russia · St Petersburg

St Petersburg in March

Griboedova Canal, St Petersburg

I was just about to post these photos taken back in March to say goodbye to winter when we had a snow storm all of a sudden! I hope that this will not prevent the spring to take over…

Griboedova Canal, St Petersburg

I’m now reading Mikhail Prishvin‘s diary from 1930 and 1931 and he calls this first period of spring ‘the spring of light’. Look how light it is at 6 in the morning! I have a privilege to contemplate the sunrise from my 23rd floor every day:

Spring Light in St Petersburg

And then 12 hours later same day:

Spring Light in St Petersburg

The spring of light starts around February 20, I suppose, and by March 8 you can jog in the early morning and actually enjoy the first rays of sunshine. Now that the day is long you feel you can do more in one day: it’s a shame not to when the sun stays up so long!

Griboedova Canal, St Petersburg

Walking along the Griboyedova Canal makes you wonder why anyone might ever want to leave this city – it has everything! A special place on this planet indeed.

Griboedova Canal, St Petersburg

A few days before that walk in the spring sun, we went to a much needed and long-waited-for concert of the only Russian performer I actually love, Zemfira. The first time I went to her concert was 16 years ago and that was one of the strongest emotional experiences I ever got. Just love her music, her creativity, her voice, her talent. Love being part of the love that is exchanged between her and the people who love her. This shot was taken just before the concert – a warm evening and such a great concert!

Sunset

This post is a continuation to Spring in St Petersburg. The Beginning and it joins my St Petersburg series.

G.

no recipe · St Petersburg

Spring in St Petersburg. The Beginning

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

The frosty mornings do not discourage us. We believe that the spring has come to St Petersburg! Just a few shots of the city on a fine sunny day: we’ll walk together from the Summer Garden to Nevsky. Look at the clear ‘washed’ sky and the warm sun which is eager to melt this ice away!

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

The Summer Garden is in its transparent state now – when I walk along the Fontanka river, I can see though its bare trees. On some mornings the garden appears to be silver.

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

The crazy St Petersburg springtime sun – so very intense my eyeglasses become super dark immediately and my head starts aching. Two more things that distinguish the early spring in St Pete: wind and sand.

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

Going to this church soon to hear the choir performing Rachmaninov.

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

The pseudo-Russian style and the mosaics – so very elaborate that you can barely register all the details.

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

The grate of the Mikhaylovsky garden (belongs to the Russian Museum) which is close to the Church of the Saviour on Blood is one of my favourites. Its gates also feature some mosaics.

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

Soon it will all be covered in luscious green. Oh how we miss the green colour here in St Petersburg!

St Petersburg, Spring 2016

And here our short walk ends. We’re close to the Nevsky Prospekt and its busy crowds prevent you from observing the nature and its symbiosis with the city.

Adding this to the St Petersburg series.

G.