Family recipe · sourdough

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Last weekend I experimented with spelt flour which I had never used before in baking. I drew upon my basic sourdough recipe which I use most of the weekends when baking black bread for my family. I also use it for baking so-called white bread as well. So you can almost call it a family recipe now.

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

I cannot say that the whole-grain spelt flour added in rather small amounts in relation to the bulk of all purpose flour brought in some specific flavour. Also, there was my sourdough culture which is rye.

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

So in the end,  the baguettes had quite a dense crumb with a general whole-grainy look and flavour. But that flavour they had for sure!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

1 year ago – Spring in St Petersburg. The Beginning
2 years ago – Stirato or Italian Baguettes
3 years ago – 2,800 km of Russia Seen from Above
4 years ago – What a Peach! Sunny Cake and a Zesty Cranberry Cake
5 years ago – Pane al Cioccolato… Senza Cioccolato

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes adapted from basic sourdough bread recipe originally adapted from Darnitsky bread recipe

Ingredients:

For the starter:

  • 1 Tb rye sourdough starter from the fridge
  • 100 g water
  • 100 g rye flour

For the bread:

  • 200-220 g of water
  • 150 g spelt flour
  • 200 g all purpose flour, more if needed
  • 1 tsp salt
  • pumpkin seeds

Procedure:

Take a tablespoon of sourdough starter from the fridge and mix it with 100 g of water and 100 of rye flour, then leave it overnight.

In the morning when your starter has puffed up, add 200-220 g of water, 150 g spelt flour and 200 g all purpose flour, salt and pumpkin seeds. You should get quite thick though sticky dough so keep adding all purpose flour as needed. You should be able to fold the dough. Leave it covered for more than one hour, making at least one fold in between (if it’s too sticky, use either more flour or water your hands). Now you can either flour a glass bowl or a proofing basket, shape the bread into a round loaf, flour it and place it in the bowl, cover and leave to rise for an hour. Alternatively, you can make baguettes by dividing the dough in two and then folding and rolling each part to create 2 baguettes, place them on paper / baking mat, then cover and leave the shaped dough to rise for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 225 ‘C with a pan / tray on the bottom to create steam and a reversed tray in the middle (as a sort of baking stone). Reverse the loaf onto a baking mat / paper, make several slashes and slide it onto the hot tray / slash the baguettes diagonally and slide them onto the reversed tray together with the paper. Pour some water into the pan on the bottom to create steam. I usually do not change the temperature but if I see that the loaf is browning too much, I might decrease the temperature or move it to a lower rack. The baking takes from 30-35 minutes for the baguettes to 45-50 for a loaf.

Remarks: I tried hard to shape these baguettes, working the dough quite a lot by folding and rolling and re-rolling, and they puffed up nicely in the oven, also growing quite chewy crust.

Result: Flavourful and chewy. You might not tell at once that they are made with spelt flour but these baguettes are perfect for breakfast. Pumpkin seeds are good too!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Here pictured with the precious Piave cheese from Italy’s Veneto region:

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

It was a pretty Sunday morning and I took a lot of photos of the baguettes. I also spotted this thingy here which is a projector for silent cinema reels we have of me and my sister. My Mother is being busy converting the films into megabytes of me and my sister doing the pretty mundane things – without a sound 🙂 Yes, sometimes I do feel I was born way earlier than what my passport claims!

Spelt Sourdough Baguettes

Adding this post to my Sourdough Bread collection.

G.

bread · Italian recipe · leftovers

Pane a Spiga con Patate or Spike-Like Potato Bread

Pane con Patate

These last days of the year I’ve been baking a lot – making up for the days I’m going to be away from the family oven soon 🙂 Among all that I could manage to bake and squeeze into the freezer for my parents, this potato bread in particular stands out of the crowd. This is an Italian recipe which originally calls for lard but which I quite successfully turned into a vegetarian version, using butter instead.

Pane con Patate

It looks kind of funny too. It’s supposed to resemble a spike (spiga) but mine looks more like some insect. Well it might as well but it certainly tastes like white bread! 🙂

Pane con Patate

A year ago – Architectural Walks in Kolpino Part 6 – Prospekt Lenina

Two years ago – Old-Fashioned Apple Slab and Greek Crumble

Three years ago – Goodbye 2013

Four years ago – Let Me Invite You into the New Year

Five years ago – Flammekueche

Pane a Spiga con Patate or Italian Spike-Like Potato Bread translated and adapted from the original recipe at ilpane.blogspot.com will make a giant loaf of soft and sweetish white bread.

Ingredients:

  • 500 g flour (or farina 0 if you can get it), sifted
  • 200 g water
  • 12 g fresh yeast – I used an equivalent 1.4 tsp of instant yeast
  • 10 g salt
  • 15 g sugar
  • 25 g home made lard – I used butter instead
  • 300 g of boiled and pureed potatoes (weigh them after pureeing)

Procedure:

Place all the ingredients in a big bowl, adding the pureed potatoes last. Knead the dough pretty well, about 10 minutes, then place the dough into a greased bowl. Leave to rise for 1 hour. Turn the dough out onto a work surface and form 2 logs (batards), one smaller than the other (roughly a 1/3 and a 2/3) and leave them to rise for 30 minutes. With a help of a rolling pin or just with your hand make an indent in the center of the bigger log and place there the smaller one, pinching it so that they stick to each other (I had to reshape them both after the 30-minute rise as they were quite puffed at that point). Cover the loaf and leave it to rise for 40 more minutes. Dust it abundantly with ground bran (almost forgot to do it and dusted it with lour instead) and cut the top part with scissors to resemble a spike (I cut the lower part too and in a much freer fashion so to speak 🙂 ). Bake in the preheated 220 °C oven for 30 minutes or until your bread is done (mine took a bit longer).

Pane con Patate

Remarks: I used leftover potato puree which my Mother makes with milk and butter (plus salt). There were little bits of it visible in the crumb and I think the puree also added sweetness to the bread. I guess that eaten with some soup or cheese will counterbalance the sweetness. The loaf is huge but has baked through just fine.

Pane con Patate

Result: Soft and really white, a tad on the sweet side with a contrasting ‘burnt’ crust. Flavourful. The recipe is quite easy (having leftover potato puree helps a lot too) and yet the result is pretty impressive. And it does taste Italian to me! 

Pane con Patate

The air bubbles and the crust:

Pane con Patate

If you are looking for more Italian bread, here’s another – sourdough – version of potato bread (also with herbs) Pane con Patate ed Erba Cipollina, sourdough oatmeal bread Pane di avena a lievitazione naturale, leavened Italian Panini all’Olio, Pane Tipo Altamura, Tuscan Bread, Stirato or Italian Baguettes, or simply Italian Bread.

This post goes to the Leftovers, Yeast Bread and By Country recipe collections.

G.

bread · sourdough

Improvising with Sourdough Bread or Being Lazy?

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

I’ve grown lazy enough these days to start baking without a recipe. This concerns both bread and sweet things. Not all of my free-baking experiments are successful but I guess I get some extra pleasure from those which do happen to be successful. And there’s always this risky feeling of experimenting which I do enjoy!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

So what I do is feed my rye sourdough culture with rye flour + water and then after an overnight rest I divide it and use the larger amount for the rye bread and a smaller for white bread. Sometimes if I just need some white bread, I feed the culture with white flour.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Thanks to the now mature sourdough culture (been using it since 2011) I usually do no add any yeast, but this time I wanted a more ‘fluffy’ result with my white bread, so I added a bit of instant yeast to the dough. I also tend to overload my bread with seeds and bran, so sometimes it all results in quite a dense and moist crumb, just like this time when I also added rye malt:

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Oh, breaking this just-out-of-the-oven bread is so very tantalizing!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

Of course the rye version which I make with rye flour + all-purpose / whole-wheat flour does not rise as much in the oven – although it does rise a lot before baking, as this rye flour is so very reactive!

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

If you’re looking for a perfect sourdough bread recipe, it doesn’t exist. I mean, you should probably just figure it our for yourself. I ‘created’ mine out of Darnitsky bread recipe which I’ve been using for quite a long time already.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

For me, the best formula is to take several tablespoons of sourdough culture from the fridge, feed it with about 200 g of water and 200 of rye flour, then leave it overnight. At this point you can either split it for two breads or make one large loaf. Then I add about 200 g of water, 200 g or more of rye flour, more or less the same amount of white flour, salt, various extras like wheat, oat or rye bran, coriander, sunflower, pumpkin or flax seeds, oatmeal, rye malt, sometimes honey etc. I try to achieve a sort of thickish dough so that it will keep the shape, if it’s going to be rye bread it will be sticky but you should be able to fold it and almost knead it. I then leave it covered for more than an hour, sometimes I make several folds and leave it for some more time to rest (rise). I then flour a glass bowl, shape the bread into a round loaf, flour it and place it in the bowl. Alternatively, I make rolls if I see that the dough (usually with more white flour than rye) is quite easy to shape. I leave it to rise for yet another hour covered and preheat the oven to 225 ‘C with a pan on the bottom (for steam) and a reversed tray in the middle (it acts as a baking stone for me). I then reverse the loaf onto a baking mat / paper, make several slashes and slide it onto the hot tray. I pour some water into the pan on the bottom to create steam (not much so that it evaporates and I don’t need to take the pan out during the baking). I usually do not change the temperature but if I see that the loaf is browning too much, I might decrease the temperature or move it to a lower rack. The baking takes from 25-30 minutes (for the rolls) to 45-50 for the loaf.

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

This might not sound as a very precise formula but then this is what I call experimenting with the sourdough! You never know even with a perfect recipe whether your bread will come out right or not, because this living thing called sourdough culture can have its moods 🙂

Improvising with Sourdough Bread

What’s your personal sourdough bread formula?

Adding this post to Sourdough bread collection.

G.

bread · Greek recipe · pies · vegetarian

Greek: Grandma’s Cheese Pies and Homemade Village Bread

(Greek) Grandma's Cheese

I’ve got two Greek recipes to share with you: cheese pies and bread. Both recipes call for whole-wheat flour which in Greece is not that very common unless you really turn to home or rather village cooking. And that’s exactly what I like in cooking – let’s walk on the rustic side of it!

(Greek) Grandma's Cheese

1 year ago – Italian Sourdough Bread with Potatoes and Herbs

2 years ago – Sunflower Seed Rye Sourdough or We Need Sun Here

3 years ago – Thessaloniki

4 years ago – Mangoes and Rye to Welcome Spring

(Greek) Grandma’s Cheese Pies or Tiropitakia tis giagias (Τυροπιτάκια της γιαγιάς) translated and adapted from bettyscuisine.blogspot.com will make lots of pies with rubbery cheese filling – a Greek version of hand pies. Beware (:) the entire recipe will make about 40 big pies! I halved the recipe and yet got about 2 trays of pies 🙂 See my remarks in italics.

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg whole-wheat flour
  • 1 Greek yogurt case – was not sure about the volume so added about a cup for 500 g flour, using a mixture of milk and kefir
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup olive oil + added salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 700 g Feta, crumbled with a fork – I used a 250 g pack of 5% fat tvorog (cottage cheese) + 290g Adygea cheese (for all three fillings) + fresh rosemary, salt and pepper. Second filling was some cooked millet and third – Adygea cheese + green onions, fresh rosemary, salt and pepper

(Greek) Grandma's Cheese

Procedure:

Mix flour with yogurt (I would suggest adjusting the amount of liquid accordingly), soda, eggs and oil. Knead well and divide into pieces (I also let the dough rest about 20 minutes which made it softer). Roll each piece into a round disk and place a spoonful of the filling on one side. Cover the filling with the other side of the disk and pinch the edges. You should get crescent-shaped pies (I also tried other shapes, see remarks). Place the pies on a greased baking tray (I used a silicon mat) and bake at 200 ‘C for 20 minutes (before baking I sprinkled the pies with some water).

(Greek) Grandma's Cheese

Remarks: My pies took exactly 20 minutes to bake – no matter what shape I used. First I thought about making small pies just like pelmeni (or Russian ravioli) but soon got tired of all the rolling, cutting and pinching, so made medium-small pies with the rest of the dough. And I should really warn you that we’re dealing here with a truly Greek recipe that will feed all your relatives! 🙂 So I would suggest making only half of the dough recipe or you might end up with no filling! Even with half of the dough I still had to invent more filling options thus adding fresh herbs (rosemary was good!) and using both cottage cheese and soft white cheese.

(Greek) Grandma's Cheese

Result: I tried the smaller pies right out of the oven – they were hot (apparently) and rather rubbery with all the soft cheese inside. If you’re using real Feta (lucky you!) I bet your pies will be quite salty and won’t need any special spicy twist to them (the dough might seem a bit bland even with the added salt). You can serve these as a starter – or if you make them big as the author suggests, they can become your lunch or dinner! 

(Greek) Grandma's Cheese

***

Homemade Village Bread

I’m still looking forward to finding that very recipe which will result in the super soft and super whole-wheat rustic bread I ate almost each day at the free (!) student canteen in Thessaloniki. Gosh, even my parents remember it! 🙂 I guess the thing was in the flour which was rough but yet gave that wonderful flavour to the bread. And it was soft too – with a crunchy crust. Oh, that bread was perfect… So here’s what I call the Greek size:

Homemade Village Bread

Homemade Village Bread or Khoriatiko psomi spitiko viologiko (Χωριάτικο ψωμί σπιτικό βιολογικό) translated and adapted from www.sintagespareas.gr will make a huge flagrant bread with super soft crumb and yet all those healthy bran bits inside. See my remarks in italics.

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg ‘village’ flour (whole wheat) – made a mixture of whole wheat + all purpose + wheat and rye bran + some oats for the topping
  • 2 packages of instant dried yeast – used less
  • 500 ml lukewarm water – had to use more
  • 1 shot of olive oil (Greek, please!)
  • 2 tsp salt

Procedure:

In a big plastic bowl (not necessarily🙂 mix all the flour with the yeast. Add salt and gradually pour in the lukewarm water, mixing well with your hands (yep, that’s how you do it!). Knead vigorously so that it becomes soft. Cover the bowl with a towel and a blanket (I just used plastic). Leave the dough to double in size in a warm place for at least 2 hours.

Then add the oil and knead well again. Place the dough in a greased and floured baking pan (preferably a large thick non-stick pan or tray). Slash the surface (I also brushed it with olive oil + sprinkled oats). Preheat the oven to 180 ‘C for 10 minutes, place the bread on the middle rack and bake it for about an hour (I had to move it to the lower rack at the end and baked just 55 min.).

When the bread is ready, take it out of the oven and out of the pan and leave it on a rack so that it gets rid of all the moisture inside.

Homemade Village Bread

Remarks: With all its Greek dimensions the bread did bake through! However, if you’re not planning to gobble this entire loaf at once (which you will surely do if you try just a bit!) and would prefer to freeze a part of it, I would suggest baking two loaves out of this recipe. I eventually cut the bread in – still – huge pieces and froze them. Beware of the burning top – I had to move the pan to the lower rack as the oats started burning and the voluminous top was menacing to reach the upper heater.

Homemade Village Bread

Result: The crumb is really very soft – and crumbly while the crust is… you get it, crusty! :). It’s hard to slice this bread properly – but I’m sure you will manage without perfect slices! This bread won’t keep well because a). you will eat it fast no matter how huge it is and b). the crumb has lots of moisture in it.

Homemade Village Bread

Hope I’ve given you a desire to bake some nice rustic Greek food. Ideal at the end of the winter (let’s hope we’re getting there soon!).

This post goes to Lunch / Dinner, Leavened Bread and Greek recipe collections.

In neverending search for wonderful food, always yours,

G.

bread · French recipe · Italian recipe · pies · sourdough · sweet

Pear Croustade and Pane Tipo Altamura

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Sharing with you two recipes I’ve tried recently. That was a rather gloomy day (typical St Petersburg!) which of course did not prevent us from enjoying the food 🙂 Let’s start with the sweet part of the post (how untypical!).

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

A year ago – Buttery Sourdough Buns and Off We Go

Two years ago – Two Cloudberry Cakes

Three years ago – Apples and Chocolate

Four years ago – Meanwhile… What’s Cooking in My Post-Soviet Kitchen Apart from Soviet Things

Pear Croustade adapted from kalofagas.ca will make a super-flavourful and super-crunchy tarte! Check out the link to get the entire recipe.

My changes: Used 3 pears without peeling. Did not add lemon juice or allspice, just the ground anise seeds.

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

Remarks: A croustade (typically made with apples in France) is supposed to be crunchy so do not worry if your crust is too thin, it will work out perfectly fine! The original recipe comes from USA though, but I can imagine such a croustade being perfectly French too. I was lazy enough to grate some allspice over the pears but I guess the two spices would taste even more untypical in this pie!

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

Result: Soft pears on a crunchy crust! A very untypical combination of anise and pears will make this pie disappear too fast 🙂 It’s rustic and at the same time sophisticated – or rather, delicate.

Pear Croustade from kalofagas.ca

*** 

After a French-American recipe, here’s some Italian bread made with rye sourdough culture. A huge loaf with white crumb and air bubbles:

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Pane Tipo Altamura or Altamura Bread adapted from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com will make a giant loaf of crumbly white bread. For the entire recipe please visit the original website (where you will find lots of other great recipes like Soder Light Rye or Pane di Ceci for example).

My changes: Fed my rye sourdough culture with whole wheat flour which resulted in a slightly less white color of the crumb. Used all purpose flour instead of high protein white wheat flour.

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Remarks: I guess I overproofed my loaf (the second rise) and when I turned it over onto the hot baking sheet it just became very flat. However, with the high temperature and all, it rose and there were all those air bubbles inside too! Due to this flattening I got a giant loaf which I had to cut in four so that it fits into the freezer!

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

Result: Crumbly though quite thick this white bread from Italy will make great sandwiches and also impress everyone with its size! 🙂 You can tell that there’s more to it than just plain white flour from the meaty crumb and a somewhat different texture overall. The crust is chewy and there were no unbaked spots!

Pane Tipo Altamura from www.myitaliansmorgasbord.com

My new job is keeping me busy all the time but I can tell you one thing: I am in love with the city center once again! Walking from Nevsky to that spot where Fontanka and Neva meet each other, with the leaves falling and the clear air, almost touristless sights (too early) and bridges-bridges-bridges… Well, I love you St Pete!

Adding these recipes to Sweet, Sourdough and Country-specific collections.

G.

bread · Greek recipe

Greek Olive Buns and Breadsticks

Eliopsomo Khoriatiko or Village Olive Bread from bettyscuisine.blogspot.com

I opened a huge jar of black olives… and here’s what I baked with them 🙂

Eliopsomo Khoriatiko or Village Olive Bread from bettyscuisine.blogspot.com

I’m not a fan of olives sketo (plain) but like having them in my pizza, for example. And although those olives I used were not Greek (too expensive these days…), I chose these two Greek bread recipes requiring the famous Kalamata olives. Here are two takes on the eliopsomo (literally ‘olive bread’) theme. Let’s start with the whole wheat buns:

Eliopsomo Khoriatiko or Village Olive Bread from bettyscuisine.blogspot.com

A year ago – Spanakopita and Mediterranean Vegetable Millefeuille

Two years ago – Summer Goes On with Sourdough Mini-Rolls

Three years ago – Pommes. Pommes de Terre too

Ελιόψωμο χωριάτικο, Eliopsomo Khoriatiko or Village Olive Bread translated and adapted from bettyscuisine.blogspot.com will make super soft and salty buns with olives and whole wheat flour. See my remarks in italics.

Ingredients:

  • 500 g strong flour for rustic bread – in Greece you can purchase this from a local bakery, for the want of which I used whole wheat flour
  • 1 packet dried yeast – I used instant yeast
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 1/3 cups lukewarm water
  • 10 Kalamata olives

Procedure:

In a bowl mix flour, yeast and salt. Gradually add lukewarm water. Knead 5-6 minutes (the original recipe suggests using a mixer). Chop olives and add them to the dough. Continue kneading for 2-3 minutes, till the olives are well distributed. Dust the dough with some flour and leave it covered for 30 minutes.

Divide the dough in 6 (I made 7) balls and shape round buns. Place them on a baking sheet covered with parchment paper. Leave them to rise in the oven at 50 ‘C for about 30 minutes. Increase the temperature to 180 ‘C and bake for 30 minutes. They are ready if the bottom sounds hollow when tapped. Leave to cool on the rack.

Eliopsomo Khoriatiko or Village Olive Bread from bettyscuisine.blogspot.com

Remarks: Be careful with the salt if your olives are quite salty. Make less buns if you want larger buterbrod. I liked it that with only whole wheat flour they turned out so well – soft and puffy!

Result: Soft, salty and easy to make! Keep shape perfectly, will brighten up your breakfast – or lunch.

Eliopsomo Khoriatiko or Village Olive Bread from bettyscuisine.blogspot.com

***

Olive bread sticksfrom cookmegreek.blogspot.com

Olive bread sticks adapted from cookmegreek.blogspot.com will make soft, salty and addictive tyanuchki (stickjaw). For the entire recipe see the original post.

My changes: Decreased the amount of olives as the half-pieces just wouldn’t mix well into the dough. As for the procedure – I had to bake my sticks longer than 15-20 minutes as they seemed a bit too soft.

Olive bread sticksfrom cookmegreek.blogspot.com

Remarks: The procedure is easy though makes you keep away from adding more flour or kneading too much – these are rustic bread sticks, so do not overdo them! Careful with the salt!

Olive bread sticksfrom cookmegreek.blogspot.com

Result: Sticky sticks that won’t stick long in your kitchen! A truly Mediterranean delicacy – these breadsticks have olive oil, olives and herbs inside. Perfect with soups or sketo 🙂

Olive bread sticksfrom cookmegreek.blogspot.com

Adding these recipes to Yeast Bread and Country-specific recipes. More breadstick recipes here and here.

G.

bread · British recipe · Italian recipe · sourdough

Italian, American, Scottish: Bread Recipes with Oatmeal

 PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

Browsing through the to-be-posted-one-day backlog I found out I’ve somehow collected three bread recipes which require oatmeal. Here’s an Italian, a Scottish and an American recipe, all three very different (sourdough bread, yeast bread and quick rolls) but reunited here to celebrate the oatmeal 🙂

PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

As a sourdough bread recipe will inevitably require more time, let’s start with the Italian one. Although time-demanding this recipe is rather easy to make. And definitely very oaty, I would say, surprisingly so for an Italian bread recipe and also for a recipe using just oat flour and not the oatmeal!

PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

A year ago – Neverending Strasbourg and Chocolate Marble Bread

Two years ago – Khachapuri and Bread with Herbs

Three years ago – Fragrant Apple and Pear Tart

Pane di avena a lievitazione naturale or Sourdough Oat Bread translated and adapted from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com will make a small, crumbly loaf with chewy crust and oats oats oats 🙂 See my remarks in italics. ATTENTION: requires an overnight rest.

Ingredients:

  • 100 g of active sourdough culture – I used my rye sourdough culture
  • 260 g of flour (originally Italian O type)
  • 240 g oat flour – I grounded oats plus 4-grain cereal (rye, oats, wheat and barley flakes)
  • 350 g water at room t’
  • pinch of salt

Procedure:

The evening before the bake day dissolve your sourdough culture in water, add the flours and salt, mix with a fork to get a ‘grainy’ dough. Cover with plastic and leave to rise until morning.

The next day proceed with the dough: invert the dough on a floured surface and form a rectangle, folding it from sides to the center so that each fold overlaps the other. Repeat the folds, shape into a boule and then place it in a floured basket (I use a floured glass bowl, also flouring the dough well) seam side down, cover and leave to rise for 2 hours.

Invert the dough into a pan lined with parchment paper and make two slashes across the top. Bake in the oven preheated to 200°C for at least 30 minutes until the bread is ready.

PANE DI AVENA A LIEVITAZIONE NATURALE from lepadellefanfracasso.blogspot.com

Remarks: I think this bread needs more salt, cause a pinch just doesn’t make a difference. Probably it would be better to add about a teaspoon of salt after the overnight rise.

Result: Very crumbly and very oaty! Something to chew on for the breakfast – will substitute a bowlful of hot oatmeal! This bread has the most of the oatmeal flavour and texture out of the three recipes I’m sharing with you.

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Our next recipe (in the chronological order as I baked it) for oat-lovers is although an yeast one will actually require more effort from your side cause it has all the braiding and the ‘seeding’ to it. So here’s an American oatmeal bread recipe:

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Crunchy Seed Braid adapted from www.ashaggydoughstory.com (originally adapted from King Arthur Flour) will make a super seed-loaded braid. Go to the link to see the entire recipes and all the helpful remarks (or go straight to the source recipe).

My changes: No surprise that I decided to load this bread up even more with the grains and bran, adding more wholewheat flour and using 4-grain cereal (rye, oats, wheat and barley flakes) instead of grains blend. And the dry milk one buys here in Russia is definitely far from being nonfat… I left my dough rising for more than the indicated 90 minutes.

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Remarks: I made a looooong braid but as the author suggests you can make a shorter and probably softer version. I did not use the damp towel method, but instead immersed the dough ropes in the water (as I saw done at the Greek bakery) and then sprinkled seeds on top.  Whatever method you use, this bread will in any case have lots of seeds inside!

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

Result: Seed-overload 🙂 A bit too dry – which is a natural consequence of so many seeds, of course. The oats do not have a very particular effect on this bread but add to the overall crunchiness. Very good breakfast option!

Crunchy Seed Braid from www.ashaggydoughstory.com

And finally the Scottish oatmeal bread recipe. There’s Irish Soda bread and there’s at least two Scottish recipes that I know which ask for oatmeal – those thin oatmeal cookies and these super-quick bread rolls:

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Baps, Scottish Morning Rolls adapted from www.lavenderandlovage.com will make the most flavourful buns you ever take out of your oven! Although I tweaked them up a bit, this is yet another recipe for the oatmeal fans. Visit the original website to see the entire recipe.

My changes: As I was lazy enough to ground more oatmeal, I used the already grounded barley flakes + oat bran. I did not use milk, instead recycled water from cooking millet.

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Remarks: You will get a whole tray of buns but as they are pretty small and what’s more important pretty tasty, you might consider doubling the recipe. I’m also quite sure this dough will work well as a more healthy pizza dough or pie dough. When the dough rises it might look a bit too ‘grainy’ but once baked and sliced, the rolls are super-soft, so I guess the same will apply if you use the dough for pizza or pies.

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Result: These baps are super flavourful when they are just out of the oven, filling your kitchen with a bakery-like atmosphere. And with all that they are also super easy and fast! It’s thus quite fair to call them morning rolls as you might make them before breakfast (well, in theory 🙂 The oat texture is not very distinct but these rolls are no doubt more ‘interesting’ texture-wise than their all-purpose flour counterparts.

Baps – Scottish Morning Rolls from www.lavenderandlovage.com

Adding this post to my Sourdough, Yeast bread and Country-specific recipe collections.

G.