architecture · on USSR / Russia · travel

Crimea in May: Chufut-Kale, Bakhchisarai and Inkerman

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

One of the days when I was staying over at my friend’s in Sevastopol was dedicated to its ‘environs’ or the places you can quite easily reach from the Sevastopol bus station within several hours. That day I did three in one go (thanks to valuable advice from my host), visiting Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale and Inkerman. Brace yourselves – there will be lots of stones, caves and even more stones.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

My aim that day was not the Bakhchisarai Palace with its fountain (of Pushkin’s fame – and by the way the eponymous ballet is great!) but the cave city with a tremendous view, Chufut-Kale. The first thing you see when you walk from Bakhchisarai’s bus terminus to the caves is the Assumption Monastery of the Caves carved in the rock. It’s an inevitable stop along the way – moreover, some people come there just for it.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

It is believed to originate back as early as the 8th century but with all the construction and the renovation going on, it leaves no such impression. For some reason I didn’t want to stay there for long, so I moved on. After some walking along the ravine passing by a Jewish cemetery, I reached one of the most visited cave places of Crimea, Chufut-Kale (‘Jewish Fortress’ in the Crimean Tatar language).

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

This place impressed me quite a bit. I cannot say I enjoyed the caves a lot (although it’s pretty cool inside) but I really loved the view from this medieval fortified city on top of the world.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Any of these photos just fail to render the vertigo from the view and the wind you feel up there, with the birds flying across the valley and the road looking like a thread from such a height.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Gosh, this place is just stunning!

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

…it definitely sends shivers down your spine when you bend over to make a photo!

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

…but you can also take a look down your feet to check out the roads!

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

this one in particular – with the grooves left by oh so many wheels:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Believe it or not, but this place was inhabited (arguably from 5th century) until the very end of the 19th century. There are some temples and houses left. They even had a mint there. And a mausoleum, reminding us of the Mongol-Tatars. There’s also a museum of the Karaite culture but it was closed.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Crimean spring in blossom:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

And then walking back to the bus terminus from the other entrance to the site I got lost – together with three more crazy girls who stubbornly decided to take the upper road – the right one as they thought. I was foolish enough to follow them and even lead the way until I understood no one was behind me anymore and had to run back to them to find out they apparently changed their minds, well, quietly :).

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Walking back to Bakhchisarai‘s heavily touristy center (the city’s name means ‘garden palace’) to see the Palace, I passed by some rather old houses with the signs of ‘civilization’, like this one with newly installed windows:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

There are also Crimean dogs, not just cats:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Сan’t resist posting this photo either, sorry:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Walking closer to the Bakhchisarai Palace is a bit complicated as you are very persistently asked or should I say almost physically drawn to go eat somewhere. It seems like every tourist that arrives to the Palace should be at least starving!

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

I paid for the entrance to the territory of the palace but was not inclined to go inside and wait for the next group excursion.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Instead I walked up the hill to a Second World war memorial and then back to the palace, duly enjoying only those of its corners that are open to a visitor with an ‘only entrance to the territory’ ticket.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

The city obviously lives off the Palace and the tourists (as well as many extreme sports & entertainments offered nearby). It was once the capital of the rich and powerful Crimean Khanate… And there was that legendary fountain – though not this one I suppose 🙂

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

They say the palace is worth visiting but I spent there much less time than in Chufut-Kale and headed towards my last of the three destinations that day – for which I had to run a bit to catch a bus which did not stop where I was frantically waving to it but did stop some hundred meters further the road – the bus driver was a very law-obedient but also kind to wait for me 🙂

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

The bus took me to the medieval fortress Kalamita in Inkerman, a suburb of Sevastopol. As in Chufut-Kale, you first walk up to yet another cave monastery before you can reach the fortress.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

They built Inkerman Monastery of St. Clement on the ruins of a Byzantine monastery where they kept the relics of St Clement for a while.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

When you’re done with the Monastery (which I actually visited afterwards), you can go up the hill to see the fortress and take in the view over pretty industrial Inkerman (there’s also a winery open n 1961), an artificial lake and the railroad:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

The fortress, well, the ruins of it, dates back to 6th century AD, when the Byzantine people ruled these places – it was called by the Greek name Kalamita. The fortress was consequently rebuilt and then, taken over by the Turks, it was renamed into Inkerman (‘cave fortress’).

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

This is all what is left from it:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

And here is the view on the artificial lake – they dug it out, gradually extracting stone for rebuilding Sevastopol after the War (add sounds of 80s music from one of the jeeps with local holiday-makers):

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

And here are the poppies again:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Can you feel the wind? Add sighs here:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Feels and looks like a rug – I wish I had such a spot somewhere close to me:

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

How to get there:

The easiest way is to catch a bus from the Sevastopol bus station that goes to Bakhchisarai (you’d better get your ticket at least the day earlier cause this is a rather popular destination and you might have to wait for the next one like I did), then hop on the local bus that goes from the bus station to its terminus in Bakhchisarai (don’t be fooled by the ever present taxi drivers, it’s not worth a costly drive!) from where you can start your walking tour towards the Monastery (free of charge but you cannot take photos inside) and Chufut-Kale (there’s an entrance fee). Then you can walk a bit more / catch a bus back to the Bakhchisarai Palace (you can’t visit even the courtyard without paying the entrance fee and if you want to go inside you’ll have to wait for a group excursion), walk towards the road / get there on a bus to catch the Bakhchisarai-Sevastopol bus that will take you to Inkerman (you need the ominously looking Vtormet stop – see below), where you can visit the Monastery (free of charge) and the ruins of the fortress (also free of charge). From there you can either take the same bus back to the Sevastopol bus station or hop on one of the passing buses (which I did) that will drop you off at one of the city’s main transport hubs called ‘the 5th kilometer’.

Bakhchisarai, Chufut-Kale, Inkerman

Crimea in May series:

Crimea in May: Vorontsov Palace and Park

Crimea in May: Ghost Soviet Sanatorium

Crimea in May: Ai-Petri, Swallows Nest, Livadia

Crimea in May: Nikitsky Botanical Garden and Massandra

Crimea in May: Sevastopol (and the Poppies)

This post goes to the Travel collection.

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