A Getaway to Veliky Novgorod

Novgorod

Veliky Novgorod, or Novgorod the Great, welcomed us with a cold and gloomy weather but the next day was it was sunny and even warm. A run across the bridge over lake Ilmen and along the tourist-less Kremlin walls was just what I needed!

Novgorod

You somehow miss such moments in St Petersburg – because it is rarely people-free, there are no REALLY old places and the overall feeling is that of a European city rather than one in Russia. And that’s why this getaway to Veliky Novgorod was like a breath of very fresh air to me. Couldn’t get back to senses for about a week afterwards!

Novgorod

You can see the Kremlin to the left of the photo above – with its red-brick walls and the bell towers. The Kremlin has been upgraded and rebuilt over the centuries but as it was not destroyed during the Tatar-Mongol yoke, it somehow represents that old Russia which most of the cities just lost.

Novgorod

This white wall was reconstructed there where the merchants would sell their goods, on the Merchants’ Side, opposite the Kremlin. The Ilmen lake and the Volkhov river provided the water way needed for the development of the trade.

Novgorod

Veliky Novgorod was rich and independent until Moscow took over. It traded with the Europe and the East. And it was a republic too!

Novgorod

The next day after we arrived I took a picture of the same place in much better weather circumstances. This bell tower is right in the middle of the Novgorod’s Kremlin:

Novgorod

Veliky Novgorod is the land of churches. Of all sizes and centuries. This tiny church is on the Kremlin’s territory too:

Novgorod

And I think I like it more than one of the oldest stone churches in Russia, St Sophia (11th century):

Novgorod

This one (on Ilyina Street, away from the Kremlin) is just like a rocket in a mist🙂 Although that was not exactly a mist but the smoke coming from some spring-cleaning in the nearby courtyard. We tried to bang on the door but no one would open, so we called the number indicated on the door and got inside to see some Theophanes the Greek‘s frescoes.

Novgorod

Opposite this church is this monastery. With wonderful architectural decorations. You can tell these were HAND-made. Unique!

Novgorod

And even random architectural forms in the courtyard of our hostel (which occupies a quite old building too) do remind you of a church:

Novgorod

Well, not to mention that some citizens of Novgorod the Great actually LIVE inside a church! This one is St Ilya on Slavna, transformed into a residential building in the wild atheist times:

Novgorod

Last time we were there in 2013 and there were cats looking out of the window. This time we were observed by a local instead. The building is just mind-boggling.

Novgorod

Nice combination of the rusty brick color with the grass.

Novgorod

Another example of architecture blending in with the nature (and vice versa):

Novgorod

Some Moscow-style architecture for a change, with a pink-colored church in the background:

Novgorod

Birds enjoying the spring sun:

Novgorod

Absolutely love those shapes, patterns and volumes:

Novgorod

Another rocket-like church, with a later addition visible to the left:

Novgorod

This is a church in Perynsky Hermitage. Similar windows with small circles and the inevitable signs of the civilization🙂

Novgorod

The Perynsky Hermitage stands on the Ilmen lake, where we spent some time enjoying the pine forest and the first signs of the spring:

Novgorod

And this is a different type of Russian churches, but the one which persisted the most. This is Vitoslavlitsy, an open air museum with all those log houses and churches collected all over the region to make an entire village.

Novgorod

It might be quite touristy (especially during summer and various festivities) but I like it there.

Novgorod

You can enter almost all the residential buildings and see what’s inside.

Novgorod

The interior reconstructs mostly later centuries but still you can get a feeling:

Novgorod

This long stick is a proto-lamp:

Novgorod

The Russian stove which was the first thing to be constructed when a house was being built, the place for baking, cooking…

Novgorod

… sleeping (on top), washing (inside!), giving birth etc.

Novgorod

Nice:

Novgorod

The so called “red corner” – for the icon, the beautiful hand-woven and embroidered towel and a lamp. During the Soviet times this expression got a different meaning – the place for Soviet propaganda power in a building.

Novgorod

We didn’t have much time there but I could have stayed longer.

Novgorod

Very cozy. Although a traditional Russian isba (the word comes from istopit, to heat) would be heated po-chernomu, without a pipe letting the smoke outside of the building (hence the dark walls) – all this combined with small and low windows.

Novgorod

And the windows from the outside:

Novgorod

And some more churches before we leave Veliky Novgorod:

 

Novgorod

As you can see, I’m much more interested in their architectural forms than in what they represent:

Novgorod

For me they represent the history, the tradition and the people. And the connection to all of it through the centuries.

Novgorod

More of the rusty colors. Looking good in the sun. After just a couple of centuries🙂

Novgorod

Those shapes!

Novgorod

The lace-like decoration of this church reminds me of a traditional hand-woven towel.

Novgorod

So white and decadent.

Novgorod

Hope I could give you an idea of a – well – real Russian city.

Novgorod

The weekend was great. Miss travelling and learning about my country!

Adding this post to the On Russia series.

G.

5 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Ricardo on April 20, 2016 at 8:12 am

    A picture is worth a thousand words and the adage is true. Typical Russian architecture in very good photos. Thanks for sharing. ¡Muchas gracias!

    Reply

  2. Классные-классные-классные фотографии! Великолепное кадрирование! ЗдОрово!

    Reply

  3. так у тебя оно (кадрирование) уже в самом построении кадра!🙂

    Reply

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