Discovering Cityscape with Cheese and Yogurt Biscuits

St Petersburg

Ulyany Gromovoy lane 6, 1879-1880

It’s been very windy, very-very windy these days. Yesterday at Kosheen’s concert at a St Petersburg club the singer observed that in such a piercingly cold city there are such romantic and poetic people :) She seemed actually very happy and was apparently enjoying herself and the enthusiastic crowd. Being rather on the short side I now have a usual ache in the neck after standing and jumping with my head popped up. That was a rather different concert from the one in Rotunda, to say the least :) But I guess I needed some energetic ‘injection’ to shake myself up a bit!

St Petersburg

Ulyany Gromovoy lane 4, Eclectic style, 1880-1881 (more photos)

This post is actually about a previous evening when – instead of a French conversational club at another public library – I ended up listening to a lecture on the Decembrists who were kept prisoners at the Vyborg castle before been expelled to Siberia. When you learn about those young intellectuals at school you do not feel any pity or any particular feeling towards them, it all seems kind of boring as far as I remember.

St Petersburg

Vosstaniya Street 13, Eclectic style, 1882 (more photos)

 And during the Soviet times they were praised and venerated as people revolting against the tsar with some of them trying to get rid of him by apparently violent means… But after watching the 1975 movie The Captivating Star of Happiness about the destiny of the women who followed the Decembrists all the way to their very harsh exile places in Siberia, I grew more interested in the topic. So this lecture read by a very knowledgeable woman working at the Vyborg museum, got me captivated and made me miss the conversational club! :) I went there for the first 30 minutes before the club’s meeting starts and ended up listening to the entire lecture.

St Petersburg

On my way to Liteyny Avenue, one of the main streets of the central St Petersburg, I revisited some very curious places. After reading several books on the architecture of St Petersburg I finally started ‘digging in’! I mean I can tell one style from another and sometimes even recall some details about particular buildings. You remember the essential concept underlying the entire St Petersburg cityscape? The mix of so many different styles and levels of beauty that create this crazy architectural heaven.

St Petersburg

An unidentified two-storey house squeezed in between the only operating Catholic church in St Pete over the Soviet period (Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, 1909, at least this one was not converted into anything) and an eclectic building of 1899, with an ugly recent addition (instead of a constructivist building) on the corner of Konvensky lane and Mayakovskogo Street.

St Petersburg

This monumental stone wall is the oldest puppet theatre in Russia Bolshoy Teatr Kukol (est. 1931, never been there… they also have some performances for adults), housed in a 1910s building. And here is an exquisite modernist building of 1900:

St Petersburg

Right opposite the library where I was heading to is the late 19th century building in the pseudo-Russian (or neo-Russian) style, former Officers’ House and now the museum of the History of the Troops. Never been inside due to the lack of interest in the war theme, but surely there should be very curious things inside:

St Petersburg

And now we’re finally entering the Lermontova central library, a flat two-storey building dating back to 1799, which immediately impressed me with this staircase that you wouldn’t expect in such a low-rise:

St Petersburg

Again, I didn’t have the chance to see all the rooms there, but they feel just like walking inside the Winter Palace! The Lecture took place in the White Hall with a big chandelier and white columns but there’s also quite a modern space on the ground floor which is something like an open-space room for various meetings. It might take you several lives to inspect every object at display at the Hermitage – and it will definitely take all the cat’s nine lives to see all the interesting buildings in St Petersburg!

St Petersburg

And now on to a much shorter food part of this post.)

Cheese & Yoghurt Biscuits from www.thethreecheeses.com

A year ago – Darnitskiy Bread

Two years ago – What a Peach! Sunny Cake and a Zesty Cranberry Cake

Three years ago – Some St. Petersburg Shots and Breadsticks

Cheese & Yogurt Biscuits adapted from www.thethreecheeses.com will make very soft cheesy scones. Follow the link to see the entire recipe.

My changes: Used some unidentified Russian cheese instead of Cheddar and cottage cheese (tvorog) + kefir instead of yogurt. Completely forgot to add sugar. I brushed the tops with some kefir and had to bake them longer (was worried about them looking a bit too soft).

Cheese & Yoghurt Biscuits from www.thethreecheeses.com

A bit of cheese peeping through

Remarks: I would suggest adding more salt as these scones are rather on the bland side. Or a sharper cheese, like in the original recipe, or some spices.

Cheese & Yoghurt Biscuits from www.thethreecheeses.com

Result: The inside is very soft with some melted cheese here and there while there’s also crust making these scones look rather like puffs. They do not have a very distinct flavour so you can eat them with something spicy like some soup. I recently tried another savoury biscuit recipe which was way more zesty, check out these Buttermilk Biscuits with Fresh Parsley & Garlic (I used dill instead of parsley and added some whole-wheat flour).

Adding this post to St Petersburg and Lunch / Dinner collections.

G.

Concert in Rotunda and Country Applesauce Muffins

Zinger House, St Petersburg

This week I continued exploring the mass of concerts and other events offered free at the St Petersburg libraries. I enjoyed going to these in Strasbourg which is especially rich in various cultural events. And you know what? Their ‘free’ status rarely meant they are low-quality or something. The same applies to the free events I’ve been to in St Petersburg! Actually the list of things one can do for free here is just amazing.

Music Shop, St Petersburg

On your way to the Ex-House of the Dutch Reformed Church you pass along the art-nouveau Zinger House and then this famous Music Shop on Nevsky Avenue. Continuing your walk, at the crossing with Bolshaya Konyushennaya Street you notice the familiar criss-cross of the wires against the St Petersburg sky.

Bolshaya Konyushennaya Street, St Petersburg

I was certainly in the mood of observing the things ABOVE my head that evening!

Concert in Rotonda, St Petersburg

An impressive door of the Arts and Music Center of the Mayakovsky Public Library promised some new discoveries inside. I have passed along this building so many times during and after my student years and never had I ventured inside! Shame on me…

Concert in Rotonda, St Petersburg

The concert was due in some 20 minutes so I had time to explore the interior of the former Dutch church built in the 19th century for the Dutch community of St Petersburg. It is now referred to as Rotonda (Rotunda) and is the place for various expos and concerts.Yet another example of converting churches into cultural institutions after the Revolution – a very-very lucky sort for a church during the Soviet times!

Concert in Rotonda, St Petersburg

You can imagine that the acoustics is great, particularly if you manage to get your seat right in the center under the cupola. Although in order to get there I had to move seats twice and end up with a very annoying spectator right behind me. She was all commenting and talking loud. A true connoisseur.)

Concert in Rotonda, St Petersburg

They say this is the most popular shot among the visitors of the Arts and Music center. And although I am not a huge fan of classical buildings, I think this one is something special. I didn’t have the chance to look inside the rest of the rooms but according to the photos on the center’s website, they look very modern and inviting! They have a huge list of heavy XXL-format art books there.

Concert in Rotonda, St Petersburg

The concert included pieces from mostly classical music created by French composers, performed by St Petersburg theatre Zazerkalye, one of my most beloved places in St Petersbyrg when I was a kid – a truly magical place for children! Although this theatre is mainly known for its children-oriented performances, they also stage operas and other concerts for the grown-ups.

Concert in Rotonda, St Petersburg

This woman played very beautifully. It was a completely different experience from that in the Smolny Cathedral where string orchestra of teenagers was performing. This was a truly professional musician who made her violin speak to the spectator’s hearts and years. There was also a woman performing Ravel’s compositions in Hebrew and Aramaic – I enjoyed the songs in Aramaic most of all, a very ‘world music’ experience, much more moving than, say, Bizet!

Country Applesauce Muffins from www.williams-sonoma.com

And now – some food which I devoured ate before the concert. After celebrating the final exhaustion of our apple stocks earlier this month with Apple Pancakes, we are now left with another task – use up the tiles of jars with various apple jam and apple puree, successful and not that very successful… The second type is the one I usually add to the recipes asking for honey or jam.

Country Applesauce Muffins from www.williams-sonoma.com

A year ago – Darnitskiy Bread (a time-proof recipe, I’m still using it almost every week! Like today, for example)

Two years ago – What a Peach! Sunny Cake and a Zesty Cranberry Cake

Three years ago – Oh Mon Dieu, Ces Baguettes!..

Country Applesauce Muffins adapted from www.williams-sonoma.com  will make s dozen of spicy and very good muffins. This is a very successful recipe which leaves you enough space for improvisation! Visit the link to see the original recipe.

My changes: I added just a bit of chopped hazelnuts, used less salt and less sugar, and opted for sunflower oil. As for the applesauce, I had our neverending homemade apple puree.

Country Applesauce Muffins from www.williams-sonoma.com

My first edition (on the photo above) featured chopped up hazelnuts which made the muffins quite crunchy. The second edition (pictured here with a rough thread) was done with no extra sugar, flaxseeds instead of nuts, a bit of olive oil instead of sunflower oil and some wheat bran. But wait – there’s more! There’s this third edition :) I made it just now with some orange zest chopped up finely (it caramelized and added crunchiness and extra chewiness), no seeds/ nuts but oat bran along with wheat bran and ginger.

Country Applesauce Muffins from www.williams-sonoma.com

Remarks: The batter – and the resulting muffins – might seem a bit on the dry side, so I would suggest using a runny applesauce/ apple puree / apple jam and probably adding more of those apple chunks which make these muffins even tastier. Pay attention to the baking time – these muffins will not escape from the cups so they do not need high temperature and lots of time to bake. Try experimenting with different spices too.

Country Applesauce Muffins from www.williams-sonoma.com

The greatest bite is when you have this moist apple chunk!

Country Applesauce Muffins from www.williams-sonoma.com

Result: An easy recipe for chewy muffins, a cross between gingerbread and jam muffins. This recipe asks for just 1 egg, no special preparation and when it is ready, the aroma is super! And they came up very handy to use leftover apple jam!

Country Applesauce Muffins from www.williams-sonoma.com

Adding this to my collection of Apple recipes and to St Petersburg series.

G.

Tribute to St Petersburg in Spring (2014)

Breaking Ice on Moyka River, St Petersburg

I have procrastinated with this post for 1 year. So here is a tribute to St Petersburg in spring – and a visual souvenir from last year. All I can say is that spring 2014 was much more dynamic in its events for me – while the nature was much more dormant than this year.

Breaking Ice on Moyka River, St Petersburg

I remember seeing this tremendous ice breaking on Moyka river. We admired it from the windows in our office. And then I was walking to Gostiny Dvor to purchase a birthday present for my colleague. Gostiny Dvor is a central department store which is veeery old, yellow (more yellow houses!) and has a very interesting perspective:

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The shop windows reflect the sunlight and visually widen the gallery.

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 And then I went to two birthdays in one day. The second one was in a cafe called ‘The Attic’ with all the Soviet paraphernalia you could imagine. There was also this lamp with the most recognizable symbols of St Petersburg (or rather – Leningrad). The spire of St Peter and Paul Cathedral and the Fortress:

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And St Isaac Cathedral with the typical St Pete street lights – but definitely not typical Soviet street lights!

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To these traditional St Petersburg / Leningrad symbols I could also add the spire of the Admiralty with the golden ship on the very top and the bridges during the white nights of course!

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Last year that was for me the ‘best view‘ one could have when working in St Petersburg. Well, I can always take a walk in the center and see it! Nostalgia is not killing me these days, by the way. All that happened – happened. And I’m glad that this post is published finally :)

All photos are from late March 2014.

Adding this post to my St Petersburg series.

G.

Architectural Walks in Kolpino Part 4 – Privokzalnaya Square

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This is already the fourth chapter of the architectural walks in my native town Kolpino which is located close to St Petersburg and is actually a part of its agglomeration. I’ve started the Kolpino series (part 1, part 2, part 3) back in 2014 and all the photos were actually taken in the summer. Let’s investigate into the Square that surrounds the railway station this time. This Privokzalnaya square (literally around the railways station) is the first thing one sees when arriving in Kolpino from St Petersburg by train – it forms a true ensemble which doesn’t fit in one post – or one shot! : )

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The book that I’m reading now (on Avangarde architecture in Leningrad) cites various projects designed by Alexander Gegello, a prolific Soviet architect who created or rebuilt quite a lot of buildings in Leningrad and the USSR. For example, the Dvorets Kultury (the Palace of Culture) in Kolpino was Gegello’s work. And this ensemble I would like to tell you about today was also partially designed by Gegello but mostly by Mikhail Klimentov, in collaboration with other architects, and finished by 1955.

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Gegello was working both in the constructivist and the neo-classical (or Stalin’s empire or Stalin’s neo-classicism) style – the latter following the former and becoming the dominant style up to Stalin’s death. Klimentov already belonged to the Stalin’s official style and you can instantly feel that in the ensemble.

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This district was heavily bombarded during the Second World War as Kolpino was just on the front line. Actually, entire city was almost erased and only some old buildings remain. So the in the 1950s Klimentov’s architectural bureau responsible for the reconstruction of the district was trying to commemorate the bravery and the struggle of Kolpino citizens by making monumental buildings. They were thinking BIG.

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Hence this dominant tower with a spire and the figures of a worker and a woman impersonating the Motherland for sure. Peace, labour, new life and the revolution, of course. There are also various bas-reliefs all around the building. It looks both onto the railways and to the Komsomolsky Canal, and IS still visible from a distance since there are no other high buildings around blocking the view.

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I always wanted to get there, to the top floor of the tower and look around. Here’s a chance to get a closer look at the sculptures on the top and some shots from the roof here. But I usually just pass under one of its arches leading to the inner court – a habitual shortcut from the railway station to my home.

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But boy are these arches tremendously elaborate and oh so dilapidated (and smelly)…

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The Stalin’s official style, neo-classicism, was all about grandeur and at the same time lavish details, resulting in a weird cross between the classical Roman monumentality and the Soviet decorative propaganda.

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I wonder if this VKHOD (entrance) sign was lit in the night? The lamp is definitely very old too:

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Gosh, this door has seen a lot! And is almost “eating” the ground now.

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Another arch unveiling another building by Klimentov and Co:

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This building – although in a distance from the Square – is right in the center of the two curving sister-buildings. They say it used to be a local library and then housed a bank. In pure architectural terms it is there to create a perfect perspective (see the second picture from the top).

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This is the inner part of the sister-building on the other side of the square. It is rounded as it follows the curve of the round square – and doesn’t look that very sophisticated.

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Here’s the curve from the Square side:

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The curve in its perspective plus some Kolpino folk:

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And some more details of the ground floor, obviously designed to house stores and organizations. The grate:

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This lamp did not survive to the passing of time but look at the decor:

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The center of the Square just could not do without a statue of Lenin by Manizer and Fedotov, 1957:

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One of the things people usually notice in Lenin’s or other communist statues is where they are looking at or pointing at. Lenin is looking somewhere in the direction of this:

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Who knows if he approves of it or not, hard to tell from his noble face. But the thing I can tell you is that this phenomenon of lampposts, walls, bus stops, entire kiosks etc covered with small paper stickers and bearing traces of milliards of stickers preceding them is something that is going away. People used it before Internet arrived, you know :) This bus stop board is a survivor from God knows when. I did not check since the summer 2014, it might as well not be there anymore.

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But this flag-holder is here to stay in its relative safety up there on the wall. The Square was the starting point of many an organized manifestation-demonstration in the Soviet times and anyway every building had such a flag holding thing for the May 1st or November 7th celebrations.

Why are the old things infinitely more attractive than the new ones? Because the old things have history. They might have belonged to someone else and that makes you curious to begin with. They might have some mystery about them, some unknown facts that you would love to find out. The old Russian proverb says ‘An old friend is better than two new friends’ and I agree with it.

Will try to finally publish all the Kolpino walks soon(er or later). Adding this to my St Petersburg series.

G.

Running for Vivaldi and Pistacho Sourdough Bread

PISTACHIO-WALNUT SOURDOUGH BREAD from bewitchingkitchen.com

Yesterday we almost missed a Vivaldi concert in the Smolny Cathedral. We ran about 3 km in 30 minutes as we were being late and there was no other means of transport on a Friday night… except for ‘our twos’ as we say in Russia! The concert was well worth running for anyway. It’s been a long time since I last had such a mixture of emotions all at once – and such acute emotions. The music was so powerful that I was smiling and crying at the same time – something that happens to me only with very beautiful music or with some very dear memories.

Vivaldi concert in Smolny Cathedral, St Petersburg

There’s nothing like listening to great music being played live. The kids from the St Petersburg Conservatory School performed Four Seasons inside this huge baroque cathedral with neo-classical interiors (think white columns and a huge golden chandelier). The acoustics is great there and I’m afraid I have no remorses from enjoying this cathedral as a concert hall rather than as a church. In a way turning it into a concert hall in 1980s helped save the degrading 18th century building from being – who knows – demolished. And after all a concert hall where people enjoy such unearthly music as Four Seasons might be one of the best transformations that ever happened to a church over the Soviet period!

Vivaldi concert in Smolny Cathedral, St Petersburg

The building itself is a very beautiful sight – it’s super-tall and yet so delicate and light! I love the combination of blue and white against the St Petersburg sky. And although the entire district surrounding it has long been associated with the government and consulates, still Smolny Cathedral is something cloud-like and … a bit cake-like :) It reminds you immediately of another Rastrelli’s famous creation, the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo. And since we’re talking food now…

PISTACHIO-WALNUT SOURDOUGH BREAD from bewitchingkitchen.com

Here’s a quick note on Pistachio-Walnut Sourdough Bread that I’ve turned into just Pistachio Sourdough Bread. I managed to taste it (notice those three tiny slices in the picture below) and it was rather dense and chewy. We still have some pistachios left from my last year trip to Aegina. The nuts do not give a very distinct flavour but I always enjoy them in the crumb, a small gift from the sunny Greece :) Ah yes, it’s again cold and super-windy here in St Pete, as if those amazingly warm days we suddenly had so early just were not there.

PISTACHIO-WALNUT SOURDOUGH BREAD from bewitchingkitchen.com

A year ago – 2,800 km of Russia Seen from Above

Two years ago – What a Peach! Sunny Cake and a Zesty Cranberry Cake

Three years ago – Double Citrusy Heaven

Pistachio-Walnut Sourdough Bread adapted from bewitchingkitchen.com will result in a smallish loaf with dense crumb and some nuts to chew on. Follow the link to see the entire recipe.

My changes: I added all the levain which I made with rye flour and my rye sourdough starter. As usual I increased the percentage of rye flour in the dough too, as well as added more whole wheat flour along with some wheat and rye bran. I skipped the walnuts and added the pistachios crushed, not whole. I forgot to slash the top but it cracked anyway.

PISTACHIO-WALNUT SOURDOUGH BREAD from bewitchingkitchen.com

Remarks: I don’t like the way walnuts look and taste like in bread (they add this purplish color and turn into something rubbery) so I usually avoid them in sourdough bread recipes with long fermentation time. The pistachios do not result in something crunchy either after all the hours but I prefer them to walnuts in bread.

PISTACHIO-WALNUT SOURDOUGH BREAD from bewitchingkitchen.com

Result: Very dense and chewy, the crust is not that thick though. The loaf is small so be quick to snatch a bite! Enjoy your bread and the music :)

Adding this to my Sourdough Bread recipe collection.

G.

Lappeenranta in (Spring) Details

Lappeenranta, Finland

Once you know a city quite well after travelling there several times, you start entertaining yourself with the details that might have slipped from you before. That’s what also happens when you have some hours in a city where there’s little to see. And yet, you don’t want to be all bored, right?

Lappeenranta, Finland

And you know what? The moment you tell yourself that there could hardly be anything new in a place you know too well, here they pop up, the details and curious things!

Lappeenranta, Finland

When I go to Lappeenranta (it’s a pity to admit that St Petersburg people do it mostly for visa reasons), I have three things to do – walk along the Saimaa lakeside, make rounds in the fortress and – well – do some shopping, at least window shopping (the first option is more useful when it is cold). This time the usual walk along the lakeside (which I made first) was spiced up with this out-of-range boat:

Lappeenranta, Finland

I can only imagine the same thing happening somewhere in Russia. First, there will be no boat left overnight. Second – which naturally proceeds from the first – there would be no need surrounding it with these white boards!

Lappeenranta, Finland

After leaving the port of the largest Finnish lake Saimaa, I climbed the road up to the fortress. Or rather to what is left from the fortress, now a cultural center with some museums and craft shops. Though these stone walls are quite impressive for an ex-fortress!

Lappeenranta, Finland

Regardless of the remaining snow, the city is getting ready for Easter. Almost a year ago I visited Lappeenranta in the midst of the Easter season, spotting all the neat decorations and spring signs. This time I came a bit earlier and had to look out for these details.

Lappeenranta, Finland

There’s something that unites Finland and Greece (apart from the languages, which while being completely different – can sometimes sound very alike) to my mind – and it is the colours. If you do not take into consideration the modern Finnish architecture, the colours of the villages and old(er) towns are somewhat special. I mean, they are bright just as the Finnish nature is bright: as soon as the sun appears, all the colours become so very acute, making you wonder that a minute ago you thought Finland was too bland.

Lappeenranta, Finland

I was not very lucky with the sun (while St Petersburg is all immersed into the sun + dust season), but I noticed all those tiny neat details which tell me every time that we are so very different from our immediate neighbours. So very different.

Lappeenranta, Finland

Oh, the decadence.

Lappeenranta, Finland

One of my favourite buildings inside the fortress are these yellow and red houses. Especially the yellow which always have some interesting details about them:

Lappeenranta, Finland

Like this one:

Lappeenranta, Finland

The stairs accompany each of the buildings in the fortress:

Lappeenranta, Finland

And even smaller ones for… cats?

Lappeenranta, Finland

I got gradually obsessed with the yellow houses:

Lappeenranta, Finland

Flowers outside a famous cafe in the fortress:

Lappeenranta, Finland

No, never been there. It was closed this time too. But the look is so spring-like!

Lappeenranta, Finland

I like how the brightness of the fresh daffodils contrasts with the washed out colours of the door. New life with the old life in the background. More flowers and details could be found outside this white (though apparently red brick inside) building, which looks quite ghostly from the lakeside and so cozy from the inside the fortress:

Lappeenranta, Finland

What strikes me in Finland is the sky. Lappeenranta is so close to St Petersburg and yet – the sky there is different. A photo could hardly prove that.

Lappeenranta, Finland

Once finished with the fortress, I had only one place to go – the city itself. Leaving the last snow to continue melting in the fortress, I however found some other new things.

Lappeenranta, Finland

A bee house! More yellow houses as well :) And in my preferred architectural style too – modernism:

Lappeenranta, Finland

Just off the main street – and the city is almost void.

Lappeenranta, Finland

I wish the rest of the city was all lined out with such yellow houses – so neat and cute! I guess there’s much of neatness in Finland. Which again proves how very different we are. Moving away from the shopping streets, this time I finally visited the market, finding these funny decorations:

Lappeenranta, Finland

And yes, there is another post on Lappeenranta – you can see how it looks (and even shines with all the colours!) in autumn here. And if you happen to visit the city and find new details – tell me where to look for them!

Lappeenranta, Finland

Adding this to my Travel collection. In anticipation of new travels next month – and more spring details!

G.

Stirato or Italian Baguettes

Stirato from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Seems like it’s Italian bread again! This one is the best if you are dreaming of a super-soft and moist but crusty white bread. It’s more ciabatta- rather than baguette-likу, without the shape of the former and the dryish side of the latter. Although Stirato is a sort of artisan recipe, it’s a no knead bread, so don’t worry – just flour, water, yeast and salt!

Stirato from www.karenskitchenstories.com

I think I was equally fascinating by its crust and crumb!

Stirato from www.karenskitchenstories.com

A year ago – 2,800 km of Russia Seen from Above

Two years ago – What a Peach! Sunny Cake and a Zesty Cranberry Cake

Three years ago – Super Soft and Crunchy Bloomer Bread and Double Citrusy Heaven

Stirato or Italian Baguettes adapted from www.karenskitchenstories.com will make a sort of Ciabatta white bread rather than baguettes, very soft and crusty, with those funny air pockets inside.

My changes: I left the dough to rest for 12 hours and I did not stretch it too far before baking, so my loaves got thicker. I used steam instead of covering the loaves in the oven. And that’s it! No whole-wheat flour added : )

Stirato from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Remarks: Although this recipe demands and overnight rest for the dough, it is actually a very simple recipe – and also very useful if you want to make fresh artisan bread in the morning and impress your family! Just wake up a bit earlier than usual :)

Stirato from www.karenskitchenstories.com

Result: Two loaves of crusty bread with super-white super-soft crumb – and all this with a very easy recipe! I tried it with hard cheese and some fresh veggies for breakfast. And although there are air pockets in the crumb, it’s quite a ‘meaty’ bite that you’ll get!

Stirato from www.karenskitchenstories.com

I came back home to bake more bread – and found not a crumb left from the two rather biggish loaves…

Non-Italian recipes coming soon :)

Adding this to my Italian recipe collection and yeast bread collection.

G.

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